Brooklyn 1.000

Scott Suchman for The Washington Post

Spirits Sep 7, 2015

Per cocktail historian David Wondrich, over the decades a number of cocktails have been called a Brooklyn; this rye-forward one seems to have survived best, but even it doesn't turn up on many bar menus these days. Amer Picon, an orangey aperitif that traditionally was used as the drink’s bitter element, is virtually impossible to find in the States. That means many cocktail enthusiasts have never tried Amer Picon and won’t know what they’re missing when they have to substitute.

Try a variation: You can replace Punt e Mes, the bitter component called for here, with a few dashes of Angostura or orange bitters, or go with one of the many amari now available; Ramazzotti and CioCaro produced tasty results in testing.

The recipe also calls for maraschino liqueur, which is not the same thing as the liquid from jarred maraschino cherries.


Servings:
1

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 1 servings

Ingredients
  • Ice
  • 2 ounces rye whiskey
  • 1 ounce dry vermouth
  • 1/4 ounce maraschino liqueur (see headnote)
  • 1/2 ounce Punt e Mes or 1/4 ounce amaro (may substitute 2 dashes Angostura or orange bitters; see headnote)

Directions

Fill a mixing glass with ice. Add the rye whiskey, dry vermouth, maraschino liqueur and Punt e Mes or amaro. Stir for 30 seconds, then strain into a chilled cocktail (martini) glass.

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Recipe Source

Adapted by Spirits columnist M. Carrie Allan.

Tested by M. Carrie Allan.

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