Charred Stone Fruit With Bay Leaf Cream 4.000

Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post; food styling by Bonnie S. Benwick/The Washington Post

Oct 5, 2018

Charring just the surface of the cut fruit creates several layers of flavors and textures. Adding salt might sound counterintuitive for a dessert, but doing so actually heightens the sweetness.

You can also char the fruit over the direct heat of a hot grill for a few minutes, then move the fruit to the indirect-heat side of the grill and cook, covered, for about 10 minutes.

Make Ahead: The infused bay cream can be refrigerated for 2 to 3 days in advance.


Servings:
4

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 4 servings

Ingredients
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 pounds assorted stone fruits (nectarine, plum, peach), washed, halved and pitted
  • Flaky sea salt, for garnish (optional)
  • Extra-virgin olive oil, for garnish

Directions

Combine the cream, sugar and bay leaf over medium heat; as soon as the mixture starts to bubble at the edges, remove from heat. Cool to room temperature, then discard the bay leaf.

Wash the fruit, cut in half and remove the pits. Do not peel.

Heat a dry cast-iron skillet or grill pan on high heat. Place the halved fruit, cut sides down, on the hot surface. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes, until you see the fruit begin to release moisture. Lift carefully to check the char level – it should be dark brown, not black. Remove each piece as soon as it is done.

Meanwhile, pour the bay-infused cream into a mixing bowl; whisk just long enough to form soft peaks.

Arrange the fruit on a plate, cut sides up. Sprinkle fruit with a pinch of the flaky salt, if using, and drizzle with a small amount of oil. Add generous dollops of the softly whipped cream. Serve warm.

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Recipe Source

Adapted from Trevor Knotts, corporate chef of the Richmond Restaurant Group.

Tested by Andy Sikkenga.

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Email questions to the Food Section at food@washpost.com.