Chopped String Beans With Basil and Pine Nuts 6.000

Jennifer Chase for The Washington Post

Jan 2, 2018

This very simple side dish -- loaded with a refreshing amount of basil -- could become a main when strewn warm over salad greens.

It's best to use haricots verts, which are thin French string beans, if you can find them.

To read the accompanying story, see: How to eat Jewish, and be well.

Make Ahead: The dish (minus the basil and pine nuts) can be refrigerated for up to 2 days. Reheat the beans over low heat, then add the remaining ingredients.


Servings:
6 - 8

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 6-8 servings

Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 pounds haricots verts, or regular string beans, trimmed and chopped into 3/4-inch pieces
  • 1 tablespoon water, if using haricots verts, or 2 tablespoons water, if using regular string beans
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt, or more as needed
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or more as needed
  • 1 cup packed basil leaves, stacked, rolled and cut crosswise into ribbons (chiffonade)

Directions

Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the pine nuts and toast, stirring constantly, until lightly browned and fragrant. Transfer to a plate to cool.

Heat the oil in the same pan (medium heat). Once the oil shimmers, add the garlic and cook for 1 minute, stirring a few times. Increase the heat to medium-high; add the beans and cook for 5 minutes, stirring often. Add the water, cover and cook for 4 minutes. If the beans are still not fork-tender, cook for another 2 to 3 minutes. Season with the salt and pepper, then remove from the heat.

Add the toasted pine nuts and basil while the beans are still warm. Taste, and season with more salt and pepper, as needed. Serve right away.

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Recipe Source

Adapted from “The Healthy Jewish Kitchen: Fresh, Contemporary Recipes for Every Occasion,” by Paula Shoyer (Sterling Epicure, 2017).

Tested by Jessica Weissman.

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