Curried Couscous With Turkey, Chickpeas and Golden Raisins 8.000

Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post

Nourish Nov 24, 2013

Inspired by the 1970s classic curried chicken salad, this Thanksgiving leftover dish sidesteps the mayonnaise and heads into entree-pilaf territory.

Serve for a post-holiday supper or a weekend lunch.

Make Ahead: The couscous can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.


Servings:
8

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 8 servings; makes 8 cups

Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon mild curry powder, or more to taste
  • 3 ounces golden raisins (generous 1/2 cup)
  • 12 ounces cooked, skinless turkey, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (2 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked or canned, no-salt-added chickpeas
  • 1 1/4 cups homemade or no-salt-added chicken broth
  • 1 cup dried plain couscous
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped cilantro
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Heat half of the oil in a large nonstick skillet or saute pan over medium-high heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the onion and a pinch of salt; stir to coat, then reduce the heat to medium. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 4 minutes, so the onion softens. Stir in the curry powder and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, then add the raisins, turkey, chickpeas and 1/4 cup of the broth; mix well and cook for 5 to 8 minutes, until heated through. Transfer to a large mixing bowl.

Meanwhile, prepare the couscous according to the package directions, except you'll use the remaining cup of broth instead of water. When the couscous is ready, fluff with a fork as directed, then add to the onion-turkey mixture, along with lemon juice, cilantro and the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil. Taste, and season with salt and pepper; start with 1/8 teaspoon of each and incorporate, adding in the same increment and tasting as you go. The dish is well seasoned when the flavors become bright.

Serve warm or at room temperature.

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Recipe Source

From Nourish columnist Stephanie Witt Sedgwick.

Tested by Stephanie Witt Sedgwick.

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