French 75 1.000

James M. Thresher for The Washington Post

Aug 12, 2009

The best of the classic sparkling-wine cocktails, this drink was created during World War I and named for a 75-millimeter French artillery gun, which should suggest that it is not as gentle a drink as it might first appear. "Hits with remarkable precision," writes Harry Craddock in "The Savoy Cocktail Book."

The original recipe is reported to have used cognac, but it has become standard to use gin instead. Champagne works best here, but Spirits columnist Jason Wilson finds that a Cremant de Bourgogne sparkling wine makes a reasonably priced substitute.


Servings: 1
Ingredients
  • Ice
  • 1 ounce gin
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 ounce simple syrup (see NOTE)
  • 4 or 5 ounces brut champagne
  • Twist of lemon peel, for garnish

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Directions

Fill a cocktail shaker halfway with ice. Add the gin, lemon juice and simple syrup. Shake vigorously for at least 30 seconds, then strain into a champagne flute. Top with the champagne as needed, and garnish with the twist of lemon peel.

NOTE: To make simple syrup, combine 1/2 cup of sugar and 1/2 cup of water in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Bring to a slow rolling boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for 5 minutes. Transfer to a heatproof container and let cool to room temperature. Cover tightly and refrigerate until chilled through; store indefinitely.

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Recipe Source

Adapted from "The Bubbly Bar," by Maria C. Hunt (Clarkson Potter, 2009).

Tested by Michael Taylor.

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