Gluten-Free Pizza Dough 16.000

Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post

May 1, 2019

The prep and consistency are different than what is involved in doughs made with wheat flour, but this recipe results in a slightly chewy crust that holds up well to a variety of toppings (see related recipes/links).

In testing, we added some fresh herbs to the dough, which is optional; we also brushed the edges with oil and sprinkled them with cheese (to enhance color and texture); neither was in the original recipe. It is useful to use a kitchen scale for measuring the main ingredients.

You will need a 12-inch-round, non-perforated pizza pan; we also liked using a pizza stone for the even heat it provides under the pan.

Make Ahead: The dough needs two 30-minute rests, plus a 15-minute rest once it is shaped. The finished dough (after two 30-minute rests) can be refrigerated for up to 1 day. Let it come to a cool room temperature (a 20-minute rest or so) before shaping.


Servings:
16

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 16 servings; makes enough for four 12-inch pies

Ingredients
  • 6 cups (896 grams) gluten-free flour blend, preferably King Arthur Measure for Measure or Caputo Fiore Glut
  • 1/2 cup (63 grams) powdered milk
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon xanthan gum
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 4 cups (960 milliliters) warm water
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) honey
  • 10 tablespoons (150 ml) extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing
  • 2 tablespoons instant yeast
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh herbs (parsley, thyme, rosemary and/or oregano mix; optional)
  • Small handful shredded hard cheese, such as Parmigiano-Reggiano (optional)

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Directions

Combine the gluten-free flour blend, powdered milk, baking powder, xanthan gum and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough-hook attachment. Mix on low speed to incorporate.

Whisk together the water, honey, 2 tablespoons of the oil, the yeast and about 2 cups of the blended flour mixture (from the stand-mixer bowl) in a separate mixing bowl; a few floating lumps are fine. Let it sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes, until bubbly and redolent of yeast.

Add that bubbly mixture back to the stand-mixer bowl; mix on medium-high speed for 4 minutes, to form a dough that is sticky and thick. If you are using the fresh herbs, toss them in at the third minute. Cover the bowl with a clean, damp towel and let the dough rest at room temperature for about 30 minutes.

(At this point, the dough can be covered with greased plastic wrap and refrigerated overnight.)

At least 30 minutes before you are ready to bake, place a pizza stone on the middle oven rack and preheat to 425 degrees.

To make one pizza, use 2 tablespoons of the oil to grease your 12-inch round pizza pan. Scoop one-quarter (about 1 pound/475 grams) of the rested dough onto the pan. Wet your fingers with water; start pushing the dough evenly outward, gently pressing it into a round that almost reaches the edges of the pan, because the dough will spread a bit as it bakes.

Let the pizza dough rest, uncovered, for 15 minutes. This would be a good time for you to assemble any toppings.

Bake (middle rack, pan on the pizza stone) for 8 to 10 minutes, just until the crust is set. Its surface will look opaque.

Remove from the oven and arrange the toppings on the crust. Lightly brush the edges of the crust with oil, then sprinkle them lightly with shredded cheese, if desired. Return to the oven and bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the crust is baked through and lightly browned on the bottom.

Cut into slices and serve right away.

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Recipe Source

Adapted from “Genuine Pizza: Better Pizza at Home,” by Michael Schwartz with Olga Massov (Abrams, May 2019).

Tested by Bonnie S. Benwick.

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