Slow-Cooked Tuscan Kale 12.000

Jennifer Chase for The Washington Post

Nov 16, 2016

Greens with a little zip provide a nice counterpoint to a table laden with traditional Thanksgiving dishes.

Make Ahead: The finished dish can be refrigerated for 2 or 3 days in advance; reheat, covered, in a 300-degree oven.


Servings:
12

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 12 servings

Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon plus 2 3/4 teaspoons salt
  • 3 pounds Tuscan kale (lacinato or cavolo nero; stems removed), rinsed well
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 or 3 dried arbol peppers, stemmed, seeded and each cut in half
  • 2 1/4 cups sliced onions (from 2 large onions)
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

Directions

Bring a large pot of water with 1 tablespoon of the salt to a boil over high heat. Working in batches, blanch the kale in the rapidly boiling water for 2 minutes. Drain and cool, then squeeze out as much moisture as possible. Coarsely chop.

Heat the oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the rosemary sprigs and dried arbol chilies (to taste). Let them sizzle in the oil for a few minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and add the onions, 2 teaspoons of the salt and the black pepper. Cook for 2 minutes, stirring often, and stir in the sliced garlic. Cook for about 15 minutes, stirring often with a wooden spoon, until the onions start to pick up color.

Add the kale, tossing to coat. Season with the remaining 3/4 teaspoon salt; reduce the heat to low and cook for 30 to 40 minutes, stirring often, until the greens turn a dark, almost black, color and get slightly crispy on the edges.

Discard the rosemary sprigs and the arbol chilies before serving.

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Recipe Source

Adapted from a Suzanne Goin recipe on Food52.com.

Tested by Emily Codik.

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