Sparkling Watermelon 4.000

Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post; glassware from Crate and Barrel

Jul 20, 2011

Watermelon is so sweet and juicy that it is practically a beverage right off the vine. A bit of added water makes it truly quaffable. Watermelon is lower in sugar than other melons, but it is also very low in sodium, which means it can be bland when juiced. A little bit of sea salt takes care of that.

Because watermelon juice is so naturally watery, using seltzer to carbonate it is not recommended. For best results, use a soda siphon, which carbonates the juice without further dilution.

Make Ahead: Siphon-charged sodas can be stored in the siphon in a refrigerator for up to 5 days.


Servings: 4

Yield: Makes 5 cups

Ingredients
  • For the juice
  • One-quarter to one-third large seedless watermelon (about 4 1/2 pounds)
  • 1/2 cup water, preferably filtered
  • For the soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt (optional)

Directions

For the juice: Cut off the rind and chop the flesh into small pieces, trapping any juices that flow out. Combine the chopped watermelon flesh, collected juices and water in a blender or food processor. Process to form a loose, fairly smooth puree.

Set a fine-mesh strainer over a large bowl. Pass the pureed melon through the strainer, stirring gently to get as much liquid through as possible without forcing any solids into the strained liquid. Discard the solids. Stir the salt into the watermelon liquid.

For the soda: Pour the juice into a 1-quart soda siphon. Charge with CO2 according to the manufacturer's directions. Divide among tall glasses filled with ice. Garnish with more sea salt, if desired.

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Recipe Source

Adapted from "Homemade Soda," by Andrew Schloss (Storey, 2011).

Tested by Sarah Meyer Walsh.

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Email questions to the Food Section at food@washpost.com.