Traditional Brisket 8.000

Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post

Apr 8, 2019

Cookbook author Paula Shoyer likes to use a second cut brisket (also known as "point"), because she says the first cut (also known as "flat") does not get soft enough while cooking.

You may also use vegetable oil instead of coconut oil, which makes this brisket more Keto-friendly. Please note that this recipe calls for coconut flour (instead of potato starch), and that ingredient is not kosher for Passover.

Make Ahead: The brisket tastes even better after a day's refrigeration. It may be made up to 2 days in advance and refrigerated; or frozen for up to 3 months. If frozen, defrost in the refrigerator overnight; reheat, covered, with its sauce in a 300-degree oven until warmed through.


Servings:
8 - 10

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 8-10 servings

Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1/2 teaspoon coconut or other oil, or more as needed
  • 1 tablespoon coconut flour, or more as needed (see headnote)
  • 4 1/2 to 5 pounds second-cut brisket (see headnote)
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sweet paprika
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon granulated garlic (a.k.a. garlic powder)
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 large tomatoes, quartered, seeded and cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley, for garnish (optional)

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Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Heat the 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.

Sprinkle the coconut flour on both sides of the meat, shaking off the excess, then place the brisket in the pan; sear for 3 to 4 minutes per side, until you see crispy bits on the meat. Transfer to a roasting pan to cool a bit. (If you are working with two brisket pieces, add 1 to 2 teaspoons coconut oil to the pan before you brown the second piece.)

Stir the paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper in a small bowl until well incorporated. This is your spice mix.

Reduce the heat to medium-low; add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of oil to the skillet. Once it is hot, add the tomatoes and cook for 3 minutes, until they break down a bit, stirring often. Add a heaping tablespoon of the spice mix and all the water; increase the heat to medium-high and cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until everything is well incorporated.

Meanwhile, rub the remaining spice mixture all over the seared brisket; then pour the tomato mixture over the meat. Cover the roasting pan with heavy-duty aluminum foil (without letting it touch the sauce or meat); roast (middle rack) for about 1 hour.

Remove the pan from the oven and transfer the meat to a cutting board. Trim any fat that has not rendered, if desired. Cut the brisket against the grain into 1/3-inch thick slices. Return them to the roasting pan, tucking them in so they are covered with the sauce as much as possible. Re-cover with foil and roast for about 1 hour, or until the meat is fork-tender.

Sprinkle the parsley, if using, on top of the brisket and serve.

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Recipe Source

From cookbook author Paula Shoyer.

Tested by Andy Sikkenga.

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