North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reacted angrily to President Trump’s speech to the U.N. General Assembly, calling it “unprecedented rude nonsense.”
Trump lashed back this morning, calling Kim a “madman” whose regime will be “tested like never before” amid new U.S.-imposed sanctions aimed at forcing nations, foreign companies and individuals to choose whether to do business with the United States or Pyongyang.
Senate Republicans reached a tentative deal this week to allow for as much as $1.5 trillion in tax reductions over 10 years, and there is a growing willingness within the GOP to embrace controversial estimates of the economic growth it could create.
An internal analysis by the Trump administration concludes that 31 states would lose federal money for health coverage under the GOP’s latest effort to abolish much of the Affordable Care Act. Alaska would face a 38 percent cut in 2026, while Mississippi and Kansas would see federal health-care funding more than triple and double.
Power lines were toppled in Humacao, on the eastern side of Puerto Rico. (AP)
Power lines were toppled in Humacao, on the eastern side of Puerto Rico. (AP)
Hurricane Maria left a trail of devastation across the U.S. territory in the Caribbean. Communication is in many places nonexistent, and much of island remained without power, making it impossible for many residents to send or receive text messages, emails or phone calls.
In this gilded age of Washington excess, Madame Giselle’s casual references to her private jet and to her collection of glitzy residences seemed entirely plausible to her neighbors. Then she proposed a special investment opportunity. That’s when things got messy.
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(Evelyn Hockstein for The Post)
(Evelyn Hockstein for The Post)
Perspective
The Post art critic takes a second look at the city’s newest monumental architecture.
The victim was held captive for several hours and raped by the two men while a third person filmed the attack, according to a police statement.
Lloyd Welch, 60, was convicted last week in the 1975 murders of Kate and Sheila Lyon.
The job fair for those ages 16 to 24 in the D.C. area was part of an initiative aiming to get 1 million young people hired by 2020.
The football team that never wins learns from loss, perseverance, and at long last, a triumph.
(Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
(Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
Officials in Northern Virginia envision use of the river system to ferry commuters from as far as Prince William County to the Wharf in the District.
Georgetown Law just hired Sally Yates, the former deputy attorney general the president very publicly fired after she refused to defend his controversial travel ban.
After President Trump’s secretary of Health and Human Services got stuck at an airport and missed a public appearance, he decided commercial flight delays would not do.
Fact Checker
Analysis
Nothing in a CNN report this week on the U.S. government wiretapping former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort warrants a change to our original Four Pinocchio rating.
The U.N. ambassador vehemently rejected the idea that she would be a potential replacement for Rex Tillerson if the increasingly isolated State Department chief were to step aside, but her influence within the administration has emerged in surprising ways.
The Energy 202
Analysis
An environmental watchdog found that phrases related to global warming have been replaced: Instead of tracking carbon emissions, firms could monitor “fuel consumption.” Instead of reducing climate impacts, companies were told they could “improve sustainability.”
The 27-year-old, who committed suicide in prison in April, had one of the more advanced stages of the degenerative brain disease.
The Daily 202
Analysis
Republican Luther Strange, whom President Trump has endorsed, repeatedly invoked his name. Former state Supreme Court justice Roy Moore — Strange’s opponent in the GOP runoff — said Trump is being manipulated by Mitch McConnell.
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