The Washington Post
The proposed increases to standard deductions and the business proposals are among several major changes to the federal tax code that the White House will begin to roll out on Wednesday. Officials say the changes will give Americans and companies more money to spend, expand the economy and create more jobs. But the proposals also could lead to a large loss of government revenue and, without offsets, bloat the federal deficit.
The Senate has confirmed 26 of President Trump’s picks for his Cabinet and other top posts, but he has advanced just 37 nominees for 530 other senior-level jobs. Cabinet secretaries say the vacancies are hobbling efforts to oversee operations and promote Trump’s agenda.
At least three leaders in the hard-line group have reportedly signaled they are ready to support a plan that would allow states to opt out of some regulations in the Affordable Care Act. It is unclear how much support the proposal has in the full House.
President Trump holds up a signed executive order designed to help farmers and ranchers. (European Pressphoto Agency)
President Trump holds up a signed executive order designed to help farmers and ranchers. (European Pressphoto Agency)
White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)
White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross discusses a tariff on softwood lumber imports from Canada. (Jabin Botsford/The Post)
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross discusses a tariff on softwood lumber imports from Canada. (Jabin Botsford/The Post)
President Trump and Nikki Haley, ambassador to the U.N., attend an event with other ambassadors. (Jabin Botsford/The Post)
President Trump and Nikki Haley, ambassador to the U.N., attend an event with other ambassadors. (Jabin Botsford/The Post)
A private reception for conservative media. A tariff on some lumber imports from Canada. A new executive order. The planned roll-out of a tax plan. While President Trump has called Saturday’s 100-day marker an “artificial” construct, a whirlwind of activity from the West Wing in recent days reveals a White House eager to cross the threshold with some tangible wins.
A federal judge dealt the Trump administration yet another legal blow in a ruling that halted President Trump's threat to withhold funding from cities and towns that refuse to cooperate with immigration authorities. Judge William Orrick called the order broad and vague.
The May 2016 rampage by Eulalio “Leo” Tordil, a career law enforcement officer, left three dead, three injured and prompted a massive police manhunt.
Less-educated federal workers were found to have a substantial advantage, according to the report from the Congressional Budget Office, but more-educated ones lag behind.
“If you dig a hole deep enough, no one will find it,” Jose Rodriguez-Cruz said, according to testimony from a D.C. detective. Rodriguez-Cruz has been charged in the 2009 disappearance and murder of Butler, his onetime girlfriend.
The California company is accused of turning units in four apartment buildings into illegal short-term rentals and failing to pay taxes to the District.
(Bill O'Leary / The Washington Post)
(Bill O'Leary / The Washington Post)
To counter assumptions and violence toward the religion, students have led classes — a Sikhism 101 of sorts — for their teachers for four years. Now they’re planning programs for educators across Maryland and D.C., and hope to soon launch a national effort.
On Monday, three people were killed, pushing the number of homicides to date to 101, raising alarm among the public and city authorities.
On Parenting
Perspective
There is a lot of talk — and guilt — about the benefits of the family dinner, but that’s not reality for many of us.
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The study from George Washington University looked at 12 dishes and found that one-third of the samples were incorrectly labeled.
Electronic devices are banned from the grand courtroom, and not even lawyers can have a cellphone in the room.
MLB:
Nationals at Rockies
0:59
10-
Bottom 6th, 1 out
5
Bottom 6th, 1 out
live
Box
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
WAS 2 5 0 1 0 2 - - - 10 12 0
COL 0 1 1 1 2 0 - - - 5 8 2
Recent updates
Adames grounded into fielder's choice, second baseman Murphy to shortstop T.Turner, Wolters out.
Adames pinch-hitting for Lyles.
Story flied out to right fielder Harper.
Bottom 6th
Individual stats
HR: WAS: Turner (1); COL: Gonzalez (2).
RBI: WAS: Murphy 5 (19); COL: Blackmon (19).
Nationals
Rockies
Player stats
Batting: AB H R HR RBI
A. Eaton CF 4 2 2 0 0
T. Turner SS 4 3 3 1 4
B. Harper RF 3 2 2 0 0
R. Zimmerm... 1B 3 1 2 0 0
D. Murphy 2B 4 3 0 0 5
A. Rendon 3B 3 0 0 0 0
J. Werth LF 3 0 0 0 0
M. Wieters C 3 1 0 0 0
J. Ross P 2 0 1 0 0
E. Romero P 0 0 0 0 0
Pitching: IP H ER BB SO
J. Ross 4 7 5 2 2
E. Romero 1 1 0 0 0
Player stats
Batting: AB H R HR RBI
C. Blackmo... CF 3 2 1 0 1
D. LeMahie... 2B 3 2 1 0 1
N. Arenado 3B 3 1 0 0 1
C. Gonzale... RF 3 1 1 1 1
M. Reynold... 1B 2 1 1 1 1
G. Parra LF 3 0 0 0 0
T. Story SS 3 0 0 0 0
T. Wolters C 2 1 1 0 0
G. Marquez P 0 0 0 0 0
J. Lyles P 1 0 0 0 0
C. Adames PH 1 0 0 0 0
Pitching: IP H ER BB SO
G. Marquez 4 9 8 0 2
J. Lyles 2 3 2 1 1
Game Details
The new budget offer includes increases in border security and defense spending, including money for repairs to existing fencing and new surveillance technology to patrol the nearly 2,000-mile border.
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke suggested that some of President Trump's predecessors stretched the meaning of the 1906 Antiquities Act to put millions of acres off limits to development.
More than 100 women have filed criminal complaints against Larry Nassar, who had been a celebrity of sports medicine.
The conservative commentator said she hopes the California university will provide “an appropriate room“ for the event. College Republicans had been discussing the possibility of Sproul Plaza — a sprawling space that has been the site of demonstrations for decades — for Coulter’s speech since the university canceled the group's original event.
Francis urged the attendees to use their influence and power to care for others. “How wonderful would it be if the growth of scientific and technological innovation would come along with more equality and social inclusion,” he said.
Inspectors with the Fair Labor Association found two dozen violations of international labor standards during a two-day tour of the factory in October.
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