The Washington Post
(Video: Whitney Leaming, Osman Malik/Post; photo: AFP/Getty; illustration: Nick Kirkpatrick/Post)
In political terms, Russia’s interference was the crime of the century. It was a case that took almost no time to solve and was traced to Russian President Vladimir Putin. But because of the ways President Barack Obama and President Trump handled it, the Kremlin has yet to face severe consequences. Through interviews with more than three dozen current and former U.S. officials, The Post tells the inside story of how the Obama administration handled the Kremlin’s meddling in the 2016 U.S. election.
ROUNDING UP THE REVELATIONS
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Stunning intelligence
Stunning intelligence: U.S. intelligence agencies had sourcing deep inside the Russian government capturing Vladimir Putin’s direct instructions to damage Hillary Clinton’s chances of winning and help elect Donald Trump.
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Covert retaliatory options
Covert retaliatory options: President Barack Obama set in motion a secret program that deployed “implants” in Russian networks — digital bombs that could be triggered in a retaliatory cyber-strike.
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‘Menu’ of responses
‘Menu’ of responses: The White House debated dozens of options against Russia: economic sanctions, cyberattacks and releasing sensitive information on Putin. What was proposed was much more severe than what was eventually implemented.
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Push for a probe
Push for a probe: Secretary of State John Kerry proposed creating a bipartisan commission to investigate Russian interference and protect future elections. Obama and senior officials killed the idea.
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Brazen harassment
Brazen harassment: In one previously undisclosed incident last year, a Russian military helicopter dropped down to make multiple passes just over the hood of a vehicle being driven by the U.S. defense attache in northern Russia.
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Toiling in the dark
Toiling in the dark: Lower-level officials were kept in the dark. A video feed from the Situation Room was shut off — a measure that had not happened since the run-up to the 2011 raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound.
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The ‘tabledrop’
The ‘tabledrop’: Obama and his senior aides were worried any action would be depicted as political interference in an already volatile campaign.
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Warnings to the Kremlin
Warnings to the Kremlin: Obama told Putin in China at September’s Group of 20 summit that “we knew what he was doing and [he] better stop or else,” said a senior aide who subsequently spoke with Obama.
••••••••••
Russians expelled
Russians expelled: Alleged spies expelled as part of U.S. sanctions against Russia included several who were suspected of helping the election interference operation from within the United States, officials said.
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Russian compounds
Russian compounds: As a response to election interference, the FBI prioritized seizing the Russian compounds in Maryland and New York, which had been modified to presumably enhance their espionage capabilities.
••••••••••
Agency differences
Agency differences: Agencies were slow to endorse the conclusion that Putin wanted to damage Clinton and help elect Trump. The NSA was reluctant because some of the CIA’s most critical technical intelligence on Russia came from another country, officials said.
As the president and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell worked to win over holdouts, Sen. Dean Heller of Nevada said he won’t vote for the bill in its current form. The announcement caught many Republicans by surprise and may have made Heller — who is up for reelection — a target for a super PAC-funded ad campaign.
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Charles Allen (D-Ward 6) said the teenagers could have been dealt with in a “less severe” way. Had the officers encountered children with a lemonade stand, “I doubt we would have seen little girls in pigtails handcuffed on the ground.”
Metro is beginning to make the case that the transit system has turned a corner on reliability issues, but it’s a tough sell to jaded riders who experienced delays Friday morning.
The issue is also creeping into gubernatorial contests, where Virginia Democrats are blasting the GOP nominee Ed Gillespie for taking no firm position.
Police said the victim was hospitalized in serious condition with multiple stab wounds.
(Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
(Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
(Melina Mara/The Washington Post)
(Melina Mara/The Washington Post)
(Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
(Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
The service for the former D.C. Council member drew a crowd as diverse as the slice of the city over which he had presided as a lawmaker.
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Retropolis
The Past, Rediscovered
A white supremacist group dedicated a memorial to the six men who were executed in 1942, and it sat seemingly unnoticed for decades on a seldom-visited thicket of Southwest Washington. It was finally removed in 2010 — but only after the mystery of its provenance was solved.
Torrential rain destroyed Xinmo village in China’s Sichuan province, state media reported Saturday. At least 46 homes reportedly were buried in a landslide.
A recording of Phil Montag’s comments about House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.), who was shot last week, was uploaded to YouTube and other sites. Montag was removed from his post as volunteer co-chairman of the Nebraska Democratic Party’s technology committee.
Texas, Alabama, Kentucky and South Dakota join eight other states to which official travel for California state workers has been curbed because of laws in those states that discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.
Rodman in Beijing after his most recent trip to North Korea. (Reuters)
Rodman in Beijing after his most recent trip to North Korea. (Reuters)
Rodman and Kim Jong Un watch a game between former NBA players and a North Korean team in January 2014. (Korean Central News Agency)
Rodman and Kim Jong Un watch a game between former NBA players and a North Korean team in January 2014. (Korean Central News Agency)
Rodman in 1997, after reinventing himself from his earlier playing days persona with the Detroit Pistons. (AP)
Rodman in 1997, after reinventing himself from his earlier playing days persona with the Detroit Pistons. (AP)
Rodman gave North Korean Sports Minister a copy of President Trump’s book, “Trump: The Art of the Deal.” (AP)
Rodman gave North Korean Sports Minister a copy of President Trump’s book, “Trump: The Art of the Deal.” (AP)
 Dennis Rodman, middle, watches a basketball game in North Korea last week. (AP)
Dennis Rodman, middle, watches a basketball game in North Korea last week. (AP)
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The Fix
Analysis
After the White House banned TV cameras from a news briefing for the third time this week, the cable network came up with a rather creative solution to get a visual element.
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