The Debrief
Like a contestant on one of his reality TV shows, President Trump has showcased divergent traits with flourishes seemingly to survive another day of his beleaguered presidency. Or, as Trump the television producer might say, to keep up ratings.
America’s deepening political and racial divisions played out on the Arizona city’s downtown streets this week.
After state Republicans tweeted that gubernatorial nominee Ralph Northam “turned his back on his own family’s heritage,” the blowback was so severe that the party apologized.
Aya Abosh weeps next to body bags with the remains of her sister and two nephews in Mosul. (Alice Martins for The Washington Post)
Aya Abosh weeps next to body bags with the remains of her sister and two nephews in Mosul. (Alice Martins for The Washington Post)
Weeks after Iraq’s landmark military victory that ended the Islamic State’s occupation of Mosul, the terrible cost is emerging in quarters of the Old City ground to rubble by airstrikes, shelling and suicide bombs. Under the barrage were thousands of homes packed with families.
The president has waged a public war with the Senate majority leader in recent weeks, but both issued statements Wednesday indicating unity on key Republican agenda items.
subscribe
The story must be told.
Your subscription supports journalism that matters.
After his girlfriend was fatally shot on live TV, Chris Hurst is running for delegate as a Democrat. But in an era of extremes, he and his Republican opponent, Joseph R. Yost, find themselves converging toward the middle.
DeaDrick Johnson gathers his belongings. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
DeaDrick Johnson gathers his belongings. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
Workers cover ground-floor units with plywood. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
Workers cover ground-floor units with plywood. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
A resident carries belongings through a hallway. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
A resident carries belongings through a hallway. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
Police officers make sure that doors are secure. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
Police officers make sure that doors are secure. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
Tanya Pryor waits for assistance with her birds. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
Tanya Pryor waits for assistance with her birds. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
Police with bullhorns began issuing final warnings around 6 p.m. Wednesday for tenants to leave the Lynnhill Condominiums in Temple Hills, Md., shuttered by Prince George’s County officials for a myriad of safety violations.
Retropolis
The Past, Rediscovered
Over the course of nearly 90 years after Thomas Jefferson’s death, the Levy family purchased and saw to the preservation of the property, out of reverence for Jefferson and in the face of the very anti-Semitism that echoed on the streets of Charlottesville this month.
The Virginia diocese also suggested  the Rev. William Aitcheson may not have paid court-ordered restitution decades ago.
Virginia’s third-largest school system, which opens its doors today to more than 80,000 students, is growing much faster than many others.
The embattled reliever has now yielded 11 home runs in 20 innings this year after pitching well enough to earn a three-year deal last season.
If the controversial former Arizona sheriff is pardoned — as President Trump strongly suggested this week — it will be one of the rare but not unprecedented instances when a president short-circuits legal proceedings and acts preemptively.
The report on the electricity grid rejects the notion that regulations or renewable energy sources caused premature shutdowns of coal and nuclear plants over the past 16 years, noting that cheap, abundant natural gas had been the main factor.
Since the diplomatic dispute with Arab nations began in June, Iran has sent food shipments to Qatar and it also has incorporated the crisis into its regular criticism of Saudi Arabia, part of the two Mideast powers’ long-running proxy war.
  • 3 hours ago
Rebecca Ruud is accused of murdering the teen, Savannah Leckie, whom she'd given up for adoption 16 years before. Investigators allege that Leckie was tortured on an isolated farm in Missouri, forced to crawl through hog pens and have salt rubbed in her wounds.
The woman got probation, was fined, ordered to pay restitution and she must serve 652 hours of community service at a cancer treatment center, cancer research center or hospice — precisely how many hours of falsified sick leave she took.
If you didn't see it this time, you’ll have another chance in less than seven years to see one in the United States. If you can't wait that long, there will be four others elsewhere in the world before then.
  • 20 hours ago
Share news tips with us confidentially

Do you have information the public should know? Here are some ways you can securely send information and documents to Post journalists.

Learn more

From Our Advertisers
This content is paid for by the advertiser and published by WP BrandStudio. The Washington Post newsroom was not involved in the creation of this content. Learn more about WP BrandStudio.