The Messier 106, an intermediate spiral galaxy in the Canes Venatici constellation, is 23.7 million light-years from Earth. This image was made by the Hubble Space Telescope with additional information captured by amateur, ground-based astronomers. (R. Gendler/STScI/AURA/AP)

Ready to escape?

Time travel and teleportation aren’t options (yet).

Meanwhile, reading is probably your best option — and reading about space is even better.

NASA might not come to mind when you think of which book to read next, but the space agency offers dozens of free e-books about space, science, aeronautics and the history of exploration.

If you’re curious about the history of space travel, check out books on the history of the Hubble Telescope, NASA’s research facilities and the space shuttle program.

There are more esoteric histories, too: “Emblems of Exploration,” for example, looks at the history of the NASA logo and those of its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and “Rockets and People, Volume 1” is the memoir of Boris Chertok, a Russian who designed rockets for the Soviet Union’s space program.

Aeronautics are well represented in the collection, too.

Keep your eyes out for books about the North American X-15, a rocket-powered research aircraft; the sonic boom; and even influential aerospace failures.

The collection also includes books about NASA itself, and specific guides for researchers looking to conduct experiments aboard the International Space Station.

The e-books open up the agency’s hood and make e-readers, smartphone screens and computers feel a bit more Space Age, so to speak.

They’re available in formats that work with Nooks, Kindles and other platforms, or just as PDFs.

Visit NASA.gov/connect/ebooks to see the full collection.