Alabama Senate election results

Live results
What’s happening in Alabama
(Reuters)
Why Jones won: Moore missed Trump’s standard in every Alabama county

Lost

(voted more

democratic)

Gained

(voted more

republican)

In percentage

points

-15

-10

-5

0

5

Flipped county

Each dot represents

500 people

Comparing Moore in 2012

to Moore in 2017

In 2012, Moore won a state Supreme Court seat. In 2017 he outperformed his margins in 32 counties, but in 35 others he did worse.

Huntsville

Decatur

NORTH AND

CENTRAL

Gadsden

Birmingham

Tuscaloosa

Auburn

Selma

Montgomery

BLACK BELT

SOUTH

Dothan

Mobile

Comparing Trump in 2016

to Moore in 2017

Every single county swung left compared to 2016, with some moving more than 15 points. Moore lost 12 counties that Trump won.

Huntsville

Decatur

NORTH AND CENTRAL

Gadsden

Birmingham

Tuscaloosa

Auburn

Selma

Montgomery

BLACK BELT

SOUTH

Dothan

Mobile

Gained

(voted more republican)

Each dot represents

500 people

Lost

(voted more democratic)

In percentage

points

Flipped county

-15

-10

-5

0

5

Comparing Moore in 2012

to Moore in 2017

Comparing Trump in 2016

to Moore in 2017

In 2012, Moore won a state Supreme Court seat. In 2017 he outperformed his margins in 32 counties, but in 35 others he did worse.

Every single county swung left compared to 2016, with some moving more than 15 points. Moore lost 12 counties that Trump won.

Moore lost support in the ring of mostly white counties east of Birmingham.

Huntsville

Huntsville

NORTH AND

CENTRAL

NORTH AND

CENTRAL

Birmingham

Birmingham

Tuscaloosa

Tuscaloosa

Selma

Selma

Montgomery

BLACK BELT

BLACK BELT

SOUTH

SOUTH

Moore’s vote share increased in the mostly rural white region.

The Black Belt had strong turnout and support for Jones, who won a bigger margin there than Clinton did last year.

Mobile

Sources: Decision Desk HQ, U.S. Census Bureau
Exit polls show gender, racial divides

Sex by race

Sex by race

Sex by race

Sex by race

 

Jones (D)

Write-in

Moore (R)

White men 35% of voters

26%

2%

72%

White women 31% of voters

34%

2%

63%

Black men 11% of voters

93%

1%

6%

Black women 17% of voters

98%

2%

Race

Race

Race

 

Jones (D)

Write-in

Moore (R)

White 66% of voters

30%

2%

68%

Black 29% of voters

96%

4%

NET Nonwhite 34% of voters

88%

11%

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