Alabama Senate election results

Live results

What’s happening in Alabama

Why Jones won: Moore missed Trump’s standard in every Alabama county

Lost

(voted more

democratic)

Gained

(voted more

republican)

In percentage

points

-15

-10

-5

0

5

Flipped county

Each dot represents

500 people

Comparing Moore in 2012

to Moore in 2017

In 2012, Moore won a state Supreme Court seat. In 2017 he outperformed his margins in 32 counties, but in 35 others he did worse.

Huntsville

Decatur

NORTH AND

CENTRAL

Gadsden

Birmingham

Tuscaloosa

Auburn

Selma

Montgomery

BLACK BELT

SOUTH

Dothan

Mobile

Comparing Trump in 2016

to Moore in 2017

Every single county swung left compared to 2016, with some moving more than 15 points. Moore lost 12 counties that Trump won.

Huntsville

Decatur

NORTH AND CENTRAL

Gadsden

Birmingham

Tuscaloosa

Auburn

Selma

Montgomery

BLACK BELT

SOUTH

Dothan

Mobile

Gained

(voted more republican)

Each dot represents

500 people

Lost

(voted more democratic)

In percentage

points

Flipped county

-15

-10

-5

0

5

Comparing Moore in 2012

to Moore in 2017

Comparing Trump in 2016

to Moore in 2017

In 2012, Moore won a state Supreme Court seat. In 2017 he outperformed his margins in 32 counties, but in 35 others he did worse.

Every single county swung left compared to 2016, with some moving more than 15 points. Moore lost 12 counties that Trump won.

Moore lost support in the ring of mostly white counties east of Birmingham.

Huntsville

Huntsville

NORTH AND

CENTRAL

NORTH AND

CENTRAL

Birmingham

Birmingham

Tuscaloosa

Tuscaloosa

Selma

Selma

Montgomery

BLACK BELT

BLACK BELT

SOUTH

SOUTH

Moore’s vote share increased in the mostly rural white region.

The Black Belt had strong turnout and support for Jones, who won a bigger margin there than Clinton did last year.

Mobile

Sources: Decision Desk HQ, U.S. Census Bureau

Exit polls show gender, racial divides

Sex by race

Sex by race

Sex by race

Sex by race

 

Jones (D)

Write-in

Moore (R)

White men 35% of voters

26%

2%

72%

White women 31% of voters

34%

2%

63%

Black men 11% of voters

93%

1%

6%

Black women 17% of voters

98%

2%

Race

Race

Race

 

Jones (D)

Write-in

Moore (R)

White 66% of voters

30%

2%

68%

Black 29% of voters

96%

4%

NET Nonwhite 34% of voters

88%

11%


Cabinet members and other senior administration officials are scheduled to appear Thursday on Capitol Hill for budget and oversight hearings, including one on the administration’s handling of the coronavirus.

As the fight for reparations moves forward, major obstacles remain.

Follow the president-elect’s progress filling nearly 800 positions, among the 1,200 that require Senate confirmation, in this tracker from The Washington Post and the Partnership for Public Service.

  • Analysis

Most Republicans think Biden has changed the tone of political debate for the worse.

  • Analysis

A first look at the fundraising quarter, a guide to the growing number of Trump administration think tanks, and candidates pile into swing state Senate races.

Biden on Russia: ‘We can’t allow a foreign power to interfere in our democratic process’

On April 15, President Biden announced sanctions and the expulsion of Russian officials as consequences for Russia’s interference in the 2020 election.

Why reparations still face an uphill climb

The Fix’s Eugene Scott analyzes the significance of a new House effort to create a commission to study slavery reparations.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said she has “no plans to bring it to the floor” and said she supports a commission created by President Biden that will produce a report later this year on possible changes to the Supreme Court, including court expansion and term limits.

Most Read Politics