MOBILE, Ala. — Speaking to reporters for the first time about the signing of troubled linebacker Reuben Foster, Washington Redskins President Bruce Allen said the team has concluded its investigation into Foster and it does not expect the NFL to suspend him.

The Redskins sparked uproar among their fan base and across the league when they signed Foster in late November, two days after he was charged with domestic violence while staying at the San Francisco 49ers team hotel in Tampa, leading to the 49ers releasing Foster. In January, a Florida prosecutor dropped the charges. Foster had been charged with domestic violence once before in 2018, but those charges were also dropped.

Foster remains on the commissioner’s exempt list, which effectively means he is on paid leave and able to appear at Redskins headquarters. The NFL’s personal conduct policy allows the league to discipline a player without a criminal charge if it believes such punishment is justified.

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“I think he’ll fit in very well into our defense as a player,” Allen said Tuesday while attending practices for the Senior Bowl. “I don’t know why we would expect a suspension, but we’ll let the league finish it.”

NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy confirmed Foster’s status has not changed and “the matter remains under review.”

After Washington claimed Foster, The Washington Post reported that Allen had masterminded the decision to acquire Foster. Coach Jay Gruden and personnel chief Doug Williams later said it was a franchise-wide decision.

“We discussed it,” Allen said. “We went back to the reports we had a year ago from him coming out of college. Think we had a good sense of who the person was and did our own quick investigation of some of the facts that we had heard. We’re fortunate that the outcome was what somewhat anticipated. We did our homework on what we had to do on the player himself. And we know a lot of people who know him. We’ll see. He still has a ways to go in order to get on the field. Right now, he’s doing everything correct.”

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The extent of the Redskins’ investigation remains unclear. A week after claiming Foster, Redskins spokesman Tony Wyllie acknowledged the team had not reached out to Tampa police. Wyllie said then that Allen and Williams, both former Tampa Bay Buccaneers executives, “had their own people.” A message left Tuesday evening with Tampa police had not been returned by time of publication.

“I’m not going to get into what we investigated, but we felt comfortable that we knew the player,” Allen said Tuesday. “And I should say we knew the person involved. Reuben has demonstrated since he has been with us that he wants to play football, he wants to do things the right way. He wants to be a valuable member, not only, of the Redskins on the field, but off the field as well. We’ll see what happens with him.”

When the Redskins claimed Foster, they released a statement, attributed to Williams, that team officials had spoken with Washington players who had played with Foster in college at Alabama. Two of those players, defensive lineman Jonathan Allen and safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, told reporters they had not spoken with team officials about Foster.

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Bruce Allen seemed to suggest those two players had made misleading statements to comply with team standards.

“We do talk to our players quite a bit,” he said. “We don’t want our players discussing what we discussed with them. We talked to them about players in this upcoming draft, and they won’t discuss it. We talked to people at Alabama. We talked to a number of people.”

Allen also said Foster has fulfilled “the things we have mandated that he do in order to ever wear the burgundy and gold.” Later, Allen was asked what the Redskins mandated Foster do. He offered no specifics.

“We hold our players to a very high standard with the Redskins,” Allen said. “We ask for a commitment that goes beyond the football field and Reuben understands what he has to do, and he’s been doing it every day.”

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