MINNEAPOLIS — The kerfuffle surrounding the wedding registry of Kyle Guy and Alexa Jenkins is over, according to Virginia Athletic Director Carla Williams.

The day after the Cavaliers guard and his fiancee said they were told posting their wedding registry online constituted an NCAA violation, Williams said the couple would be permitted to do so.

She added that the initial cease-and-desist request sent by the university’s NCAA compliance office arose from an overabundance of caution.

“That was just a misunderstanding,” she said in an interview at U.S. Bank Stadium on Friday, the day before top-seeded Virginia plays No. 5 seed Auburn in the NCAA tournament’s national semifinals. “The NCAA did not tell us that he could not do that.

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“We just have to monitor it to be sure we can take care of Kyle’s eligibility.”

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Jenkins posted a tweet Wednesday, since deleted, that read in part: “Hope you weren’t planning on buying anything off there bc ncaa compliance said it was a violation so i had to make it to where only i can see it.”

Guy confirmed as much during the Cavaliers’ open locker room session Thursday afternoon at U.S. Bank Stadium.

“Yeah, that was crazy to me that that’s illegal because that’s what a registry’s for,” Guy said, somewhat incredulous. “Yeah, NCAA said it was illegal, so I’m not going to argue with it right now. I’m going to try to win a national championship, and we’ll open that book.”

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Joe Kinsey, founder of the irreverent sports blog Busted Coverage, initially shared the link to Guy and Jenkins’s gift registry in a post published Monday. Then he received a cease-and-desist letter from Kelly Korras, Virginia’s associate director of compliance.

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The letter, which was shared with The Washington Post, read in part: “The University is requesting that you immediately remove the wedding registry link. The receipt of items from the registry could constitute an impermissible extra benefit. By posting these items, you are jeopardizing the student-athlete’s eligibility for competition.”

NCAA rules stipulate college athletes are not permitted to receive extra benefits, including “cash, gift certificates or other items with value” from athletic representatives, boosters or fans.

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“It was a joke. I thought it was funny,” Kinsey said of his blog post, which he removed after receiving the letter. “He’s getting married, and here’s his registry. But I didn’t want Kyle to get in trouble.”

In an interview with reporters Thursday, NCAA President Mark Emmert indicated it is not a violation of NCAA rules to post a public gift registry.

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“Nobody in the NCAA said anything of the sort” telling Guy and Jenkins to take down the registry, he said. “We don’t know what the source of that information was.”

Guy is the Cavaliers’ leading scorer and broke out of a shooting rut in the South Region final, scoring 25 points, including 5 of 12 from three-point range, during an 80-75 win against No. 3 seed Purdue on Saturday night at KFC Yum! Center in Louisville.

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No word from Williams on which item or items she plans to purchase from the gift registry.

“I’ve got to check to see if I can,” she said, laughing. “Not sure.”

Strauss reported from Washington.

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