Paul VI guard Anthony Harris has reopened his recruitment. (Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)

Four-star Paul VI senior Anthony Harris received his release from Virginia Tech and has reopened his recruitment, he announced Thursday on Twitter. Harris’s announcement comes two days after Coach Buzz Williams left the Blacksburg school for the same position at Texas A&M.

The 6-foot-3, 180-pound combo guard is now one of the best available players in the 2019 recruiting class. Harris said he will still consider the Hokies in his college options but wanted a chance to reopen the recruitment.

Harris signed with Virginia Tech during the early signing period in November, a month after verbally committing to the program. After visiting multiple ACC programs last fall, including Duke and Wake Forest, he ultimately choose the Hokies. Virginia Tech had been the front-runner since the beginning of Harris’s recruitment. The Hokies had kept Harris high on their recruiting board since the start of Harris’s high school career, offering him in July 2016.

Harris is the No. 5 player in Virginia in the Class of 2019 and No. 66 nationally, according to the 247Sports composite rankings. Harris, who had been a member of Team Takeover, a Nike-affiliated AAU squad in the Washington area, hasn’t hit the court since December, after tearing his anterior cruciate ligament early in his senior season with Paul VI.

Harris, who underwent surgery to repair the injury in December, said he is on track for a timely recovery.

“Probably about August is when I start playing a little bit, getting back on the court and then getting better from there,” Harris said last month. “I got to sit out and watch a whole lot of basketball, so I was learning, picking up new things, seeing what I am going to add to my game when I get back. So I feel like I am going to be a better player as well.”

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