Tony Romo, golf long shot. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Let’s get this out of the way: Tony Romo is a very good golfer. Only 1.6 percent of all male golfers in this country have a handicap index better than zero, according to the USGA, and the former Cowboys quarterback and current CBS analyst is one of them. According to an ESPN story published this week, he’s on the range every day “trying to unlock the secrets to the game he loves.” He has not one but two swing coaches.

So golf isn’t just a lark for Romo, something to kill off the days between NFL seasons. He’s twice tried to qualify for the U.S. Open and will do so again on Monday in Texas. But before that, Romo will play in his third-ever PGA Tour event, this week’s Byron Nelson at Trinity Forest, his home club in Dallas.

It’ll be the third time Romo has received a sponsor’s exemption into a PGA Tour event. The first two were at the Corales Puntacana Golf & Resort Championship in the Dominican Republic, and neither went well: Romo shot 15 over par both times to miss the cut by a yawning margin. He finished last in the 2018 version. This year, he was next to last.

Suffice it to say, Romo has pretty much zero chance to win this week’s tournament, which — while not exactly stocked with talent one week before the PGA Championship — still boasts a stronger field than the Dominican Republic event, which annually takes place on the same weekend as the big-money WGC Match Play tournament. Nevertheless, we got this betting note Tuesday from Jeff Sherman, vice president of risk management and golf handicapper for SuperBook USA, which operates the sportsbook at the Westgate in Las Vegas.

Sherman updated those numbers late Tuesday night. One more gambler has come in on a $100 Romo bet, which would pay $1 million should he win.

Those 10,000-1 odds equate to a 0.01 percent chance of victory, but that hasn’t stopped at least seven gamblers from throwing money down on a guy whose best PGA Tour finish was missing the cut by 14 strokes.

You can also bet on Romo’s first-round score at the SuperBook, which set the over-under total at 77.5 (per ESPN). His lowest round in a PGA Tour event was 77. According to the Action Network, Romo is +1800 to make the cut (5.26 percent implied probability) and -130 to finish in last place (56.52 percent implied probability).

For comparison’s sake, Max Homa was a 300-1 long shot entering last week’s Wells Fargo at Quail Hollow, his first PGA Tour victory after missing 15 of 17 cuts as a rookie in 2017 and eight more cuts this season.

Despite having a 0.01 percent chance at victory, Romo says he’s just trying to improve his game and has no time for critics who say his spot in the Byron Nelson should have gone to a qualifier who’s trying to earnestly scratch and claw his way onto the Tour.

“Well, this is what I want to do,” Romo told ESPN’s Todd Archer. “This is my livelihood. I think it’s the same as anything. You have to show you have the ability. You don’t just get them randomly. You’ve got to be able to perform at some time in front of somebody who thinks you deserve it. I’ve been practicing . . . and I practice really hard at it, just like a touring pro. Same type of schedule. Mornings you get up, it’s a routine, just like you’re playing football. I understand you only get so many [exemptions], so you’ve got to perform. Hopefully that time is coming.”

Charlie Beljan, who sits just outside the field at the moment, also doesn’t have a problem with Romo’s sponsor’s exemption:

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