Pittsburgh Pirates catcher Francisco Cervelli (29) stands by the plate during a baseball game against the Texas Rangers in Arlington, Texas, Tuesday, April 30, 2019. (Tony Gutierrez/AP)

Pittsburgh Pirates catcher Francisco Cervelli said he wants to return to catching after recovering from his sixth recorded concussion since 2011, which has held him out of action since May 25.

Cervelli was struck on the chin by a shard of broken bat in a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, and hasn’t played since.

But this latest injury may have led Cervelli, 33, to reevaluate his future behind the plate. Dejan Kovacevic of DK Pittsburgh Sports reported last week that Cervelli was done playing catcher.

“That’s enough,” Cervelli said, according to Kovacevic. “This time is different. I can’t live like this.”

“I’m ready to do anything,” added Cervelli, who has played first base, second base and first base sparingly in his 12-year career. “Wherever I am in the field, I’m still catching the ball, right?”

But Saturday, Cervelli asserted that he was misquoted and posted a photo on Instagram with a lengthy caption discussing his plan to return to the position.

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“Saying that I quit from my catcher responsibilities is inaccurate. My hope is to catch again. Not being in the catcher spot right now is part of the process of recovery from several concussions that have forced me to stop and think about my health beyond my baseball years, that have made me reflect on my health and my life in general and how my decisions affect other people that want the best for me in the long run. I keep working hard, there’s no other way for me to do things. I love baseball but I also have to take care of myself. I want to take care of myself and have quality of life now and hopefully from many more years This requires to reinvent myself, have patience and keep working In other words, to my fans, rest assured that I am working hard on my recovery and I will come back with more strength and the same passion I have always had for this sport. That, I can assure you: I have nothing other than passion, gratitude and love for what I do, for this sport. This isn’t just a job for me. This is part of my life and I can’t live my life without injecting passion and energy, heart and mind into what I do, whatever that is. " Decir que “renuncié” a ser catcher es exagerado 😐. . Que no esté en la receptoría ahora mismo, es parte de mi proceso de recuperación de varias contusiones que me han obligado a parar y pensar en mí mismo más allá de mi carrera; que me han hecho reflexionar sobre mi salud y mi vida, y que involucra a muchas personas que quieren lo mejor para mí 🙂. . Yo, por mi parte, sigo trabajando duro, no puedo hacerlo de otra forma. Amo el beisbol, pero también quiero cuidarme y vivir una vida de calidad ⚾. . Eso implica reinventarme, tener paciencia y seguir trabajando. . Así que tranquilos, que me estoy recuperando y regresaré con más fuerza 💪🏽 y las mismas ganas de siempre, porque eso sí tengo yo: ganas, pasión y amor por lo que hago 🤛🏼. Esto no es un simple trabajo para mí, esto es parte de mi vida y yo no puedo vivir mi vida de otra manera que no sea poniéndole el corazón y pasión a lo que hago, sea lo que sea.

A post shared by Francisco Cervelli (@fran_cervelli) on

“I never said that I don’t want to catch,” Cervelli said (via the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette). “That was a misunderstanding. It never came from my mouth. That’s why I posted what I did [Friday]. It’s very clear.”

“I never had an official interview,” he added. “If you come to me with your cellphone recording, that’s an interview. We never had an interview.

“You’re going to do an interview, you better pull out your cellphone [to record it]. I believe if you do something more than one minute, you don’t have a computer in your head. You’re not going to use the right words.”

That’s not how Kovacevic, the publisher of DK Pittsburgh Sports, described his interaction with Cervelli. He wrote on his website that he and Cervelli have had a professional relationship for years.

“When he’s wanted to go off the record — which he’s done a ton — he’d say so in the clearest terms,” Kovacevic wrote. “In the case of our conversation last week, he passionately stated the following: ‘That’s enough. This time is different. I can’t live like this.’ He also offered vivid, excruciating detail of what he’d been through in his most recent concussion. And he never added that he wanted anything off the record.”

Kovacevic said he approached a team official before running the story who did not express concern with the content and had spoken with Cervelli about the topic.

After the article published, Kovacevic said Cervelli sent him a text message that read, “I should tell you to not say anything yet” until an upcoming doctor’s appointment.

Cervelli disagreed with the Kovacevic’s description, though, and called the situation a “misunderstanding.”

He did say, though, that he is taking his recovery slowly and seriously while contemplating what’s best for his health. In addition to the six concussions he’s endured in the big leagues, he said he’s suffered a number of other traumatic brain injuries from collisions at home plate and foul balls off the mask at different levels of play.

“I haven’t felt normal in a long time. I don’t [remember] normal,” Cervelli said. “I’m not saying that I feel bad. You think the way you feel is normal, and it’s not. I can be better than this. If I get to the goal that I set, I’ll be behind the plate.”

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