They were hundreds of miles apart, but Jimmy Johnson and Troy Aikman provided some of the most compelling moments of the Fox Sports telecast of the Packers-Seahawks playoff game Sunday evening.

Johnson, working the halftime studio show, learned that he had been voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and the former coach was overcome with emotion as Aikman, his Dallas Cowboys quarterback, watched tearfully on a monitor in Green Bay, where he was broadcasting the game.

Johnson, 76, grew emotional as he received the news and words of congratulations from the Hall of Fame’s president and CEO, David Baker. “The only thing I can think of is all the assistant coaches that have worked for me, all the great players that have played for me, they’re the reason I’m here. And they’re the reason — I can’t talk,” the former Cowboys and Dolphins coach said, fighting back tears and engulfed in hugs by his Fox Hall of Fame colleagues Terry Bradshaw, Howie Long, Michael Strahan and Tony Gonzalez.

After taking a moment to collect himself, Johnson added, “This is so special to me, because when you put in the work that we put in, it is nice to know people appreciate it.”

Looking on silently from Green Bay was Aikman, who was working alongside Joe Buck. Later, Aikman, a Hall of Famer, posted a heartfelt tribute to Johnson on Instagram, noting that over a 35-year relationship his former coach “made me better” even though they “had stretches when we didn’t speak.” Theirs was a relationship forged under pressure.

“My relationship w Jimmy Johnson spans over 35 years,” he wrote. “He was the first to recruit me out of Henryetta High School when I was 17 while he was the head coach at Oklahoma State. Two years later when I was transferring from Oklahoma, he recruited me to the University of Miami. I chose UCLA. After turning him down twice, the Dallas Cowboys chose me as the #1 overall draft pick in 1989.

“We had a rough start, went through some difficult times, had stretches when we didn’t speak. What I’ve learned though in life is we remember those who make us better. Jimmy made me better, but more importantly, he made the Dallas Cowboys better. He was the architect of our 1990s dynasty and while as our leader and coach, he should have been the first to be enshrined, I am so grateful he will have his rightful place in the @profootballhof. — congratulations Coach! You’re gonna look good in gold! #howboutthemcowboys”

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My relationship w Jimmy Johnson spans over 35 years. He was the first to recruit me out of Henryetta High School when I was 17 while he was the head coach at Oklahoma State. Two years later when I was transferring from Oklahoma, he recruited me to the University of Miami. I chose UCLA. After turning him down twice, the Dallas Cowboys chose me as the #1 overall draft pick in 1989. We had a rough start, went through some difficult times, had stretches when we didn’t speak. What I’ve learned though in life is we remember those who make us better. Jimmy made me better, but more importantly, he made the Dallas Cowboys better. He was the architect of our 1990’s dynasty and while as our leader and coach, he should have been the first to be enshrined, I am so grateful he will have his rightful place in the @profootballhof - congratulations Coach! You’re gonna look good in gold! #howboutthemcowboys

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Johnson, long snubbed by Cowboys owner Jerry Jones for the team’s Ring of Honor, may have had an inkling of what was to come, not only because of the visit to the studio from Baker but also because the Hall of Fame president had made a similar on-air announcement Saturday. Those congratulations, offered live on CBS’s pregame show, went to former Pittsburgh Steelers coach Bill Cowher.

Cowher, now an analyst for CBS, and Johnson, filling the same role for Fox Sports, became the 327th and 328th members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, respectively. They will be enshrined in Canton, Ohio, this summer as part of a special, 20-person Class of 2020 that will include a 15-person “Centennial Slate,” in honor of the NFL’s 100th anniversary.

The rest of the “Centennial Slate” will be announced Wednesday, after having been chosen by a panel from 300 candidates (per NFL.com), and of the 15 inductees, two spots were set aside for coaches whose careers ended at least five years ago. There were eight finalists for the coaching honors, including: Tom Flores, who won two Super Bowls as head coach of the Raiders; Dick Vermeil, who won a Super Bowl with the Rams and led the Eagles to an appearance in the game; Mike Holmgren, who won a Super Bowl with the Packers and led the Seahawks to an appearance in the game; and Don Coryell, an offensive innovator with the Chargers.

The slate will also include 10 players who last competed 25 years ago and three contributors to the sport who neither played nor coached. Five modern-era players will join that group of 15 after having gone through the standard selection process. They will be announced on Feb. 1, a day before Super Bowl LIV.

Cowher, who coached Pittsburgh from 1992 to 2006 and led the Steelers to one Super Bowl win in two appearances, said Saturday that he had “come to grips” with the possibility that he might never gain induction into the Hall of Fame. After hugging his wife and daughter, who were at the studio for the occasion, he said, “I’ve been so blessed.”

Cowher, 62, finished his 15-year head coaching career with an overall record of 149-90-1, plus a playoff mark of 12-9.

Johnson was a successful coach at Oklahoma State and won a national championship with the University of Miami before he succeeded Tom Landry in 1989 as head coach of the Cowboys. Crafting a dynasty with brash new team owner Jerry Jones, a former teammate at Arkansas, Johnson led Dallas from a 1-15 season that first year to two straight Super Bowl titles in the 1992 and 1993 seasons.

After his relationship with Jones deteriorated and Johnson left the Cowboys before the 1994 season, the team went on to win another championship for the 1995 season under head coach Barry Switzer. Johnson returned to the NFL to coach the Dolphins from 1996 to 1999, and he accumulated an 80-64 record in the league, with a playoff mark of 9-4, including 7-1 with the Cowboys.

In addition to Aikman, another former Dallas player in the Hall of Fame said he, too, grew emotional while watching Johnson get the news.

“With tears in my eyes I watched my coach get what he so rightfully earned,” tweeted Michael Irvin, who also played for Johnson in college. “My Coach has turned men into CHAMPIONS on every level.”