Apart from a requirement that spectators wear masks at games amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, the NFL this season is leaving the question of fan attendance up to its teams, who in turn must coordinate with local officials. Most teams opened the season without fans present, though a few opened their stadiums to a limited number of spectators.

Here’s a rundown of where things stand for each NFL team.

AFC East

Buffalo Bills: The Bills have not allowed fans through their Week 6 home game against the Chiefs, but three Buffalo players — defensive tackle Harrison Phillips, long snapper Reid Ferguson and quarterback Matt Barkley — have called on New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) to allow fans back into the stadium. Cuomo announced weeks ago that he would tour the Bills’ stadium to learn about the organization’s plans, though no date has been set for his visit.

Miami Dolphins: The Dolphins allowed a maximum of 13,000 fans — about 20 percent of Hard Rock Stadium’s capacity — for their Week 2 home opener (only 11,075 showed up). However, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is allowing the state’s teams to fill their stadiums to full capacity. The Dolphins said they plan on keeping capacity at 13,000 for their next home game, Nov. 1 against the Rams.

New England Patriots: The Patriots have not had fans at Gillette Stadium yet this season. While nothing official has been announced, media members noted during a home game against the Raiders in Week 3 that social-distancing markers have been set up on the floors in front of Gillette Stadium concession stands.

New York Jets: The Jets will play without fans at MetLife Stadium for all of 2020.

AFC North

Baltimore Ravens: Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) on Oct. 16 said the Ravens and the Washington Football Team would be allowed to welcome fans at 10 percent of their stadiums’ capacity. On Friday, the Ravens announced that they would host 3,000 fans in the lower bowl, 800 in the club level and 2,800 in the upper deck for their Nov. 1 game against the Steelers.

Cincinnati Bengals and Cleveland Browns: The Bengals and Browns initially were allowed to host up to 6,000 fans at two home games each scheduled for September and October. The Ohio Department of Health has granted both teams a variance to host up to 12,000 fans moving forward.

Pittsburgh Steelers: Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf (D) announced that starting Oct. 9, outdoor sporting events in the state could have fans at 15 percent capacity up to a maximum of 7,500. Pittsburgh welcomed about 5,500 fans for its Week 5 game against the Eagles, and 5,260 were on hand for its Week 6 game against the Browns.

AFC South

Houston Texans: The Texans had an announced attendance of 12,413 for their Week 5 home game against Jacksonville, about 17 percent of their stadium’s capacity.

Indianapolis Colts: The team welcomed 12,453 to its home game against the Cincinnati Bengals in Week 6, following discussions with the local public health department.

Jacksonville Jaguars: The Jaguars averaged slightly more than 15,000 fans, about 22 percent of capacity, in their three home games through Week 6.

Tennessee Titans: The Titans, who have seen a coronavirus outbreak among players and staff members, welcomed 8,403 for their Week 5 home game vs. the Bills and 10,166 the following week against the Texans.

AFC West

Denver Broncos: About 5,700 fans were on hand for the Broncos’ Week 3 home game vs. the Bucs.

Kansas City Chiefs: The reigning Super Bowl champions welcomed about 16,000 fans into Arrowhead Stadium for each of their two home games this season and had 13,311 on hand for their Week 5 loss to the Raiders.

Las Vegas Raiders: The Raiders will play their entire first season in Las Vegas without fans in attendance.

Los Angeles Chargers: The Chargers will play their first season at SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, Calif., without fans until further notice.

NFC East

Dallas Cowboys: The Cowboys allowed just more than 21,000 fans to attend their home opener in 80,000-seat AT&T Stadium and had slightly more than 25,000 in attendance for their next three home games.

New York Giants: The Giants will play without fans at MetLife Stadium for all of 2020.

Philadelphia Eagles: The city of Philadelphia announced Oct. 13 that the Eagles can host up to 7,500 fans moving forward.

Washington Football Team: On Friday, Washington announced it will allow a limited number of season ticket holders into its stadium for the Nov. 8 game against the Giants. Seating will be limited to the lower level and a limited number of suites.

NFC North

Chicago Bears: In mid-August, the Bears and the city of Chicago agreed “it’s not yet the right time” for fans to visit Soldier Field, though Bears Chairman George McCaskey told reporters in early September he is “very optimistic” there will be at least some fans in the stands at some point this season. In mid-September, however, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot pegged the chances of that happening at less than 50 percent, saying the team had not sufficiently communicated its plans to the city. On. Oct. 14, Lightfoot replied “we’ll see” when asked about fans attending Bears games.

Detroit Lions: The Lions’ first two home games — against the Bears and Saints — were to be played in an empty stadium. Detroit’s third home game is not until Nov. 1, and it had hoped to be able to allow fans at that point. On Oct. 2, however, the team sent fans who had purchased tickets for three November home games a letter saying those sales had been canceled.

Green Bay Packers: The Packers announced Oct. 6 that fans will not be allowed at Lambeau Field indefinitely as coronavirus cases spiked in the Green Bay area.

Minnesota Vikings: The Vikings said they hope to allow fans at some point this season but had not through their Week 6 home game against the Falcons.

NFC South

Atlanta Falcons: The Falcons had 6,656 fans in attendance for their Week 5 game vs. the Panthers.

Carolina Panthers: Starting with their Oct. 4 game against the Cardinals, the Panthers have been allowed to fill their stadium to 7 percent capacity (about 5,240 fans).

New Orleans Saints: After exploring playing home games at LSU’s Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, the Saints announced Tuesday that they and Mayor LaToya Cantrell “agreed to a phased and deliberate pilot approach allowing fans to attend Saints games in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, beginning with this weekend’s game against the Carolina Panthers.” Under the plan, season ticket holders will have access to 3,000 tickets for this week’s NFC South matchup. Barring any changes to local health and safety guidelines, that number will increase to 6,000 tickets for home games Nov. 15 and 22 against the 49ers and Falcons. That number will again increase, this time to 15,000, for the Dec. 20 game against the Chiefs and the Dec. 25 game against the Vikings.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Around 6,000 fans attended Tampa Bay’s Week 4 matchup with the Chargers, and the team drew 15,540 fans for its Oct. 18 game against the Packers. Florida is allowing the Bucs to fill their stadium entirely, though Tampa Bay has yet to announce that it will do so.

NFC West

Arizona Cardinals: The team will allow approximately 1,200 season-ticket holders to attend Sunday’s home game vs. the Seahawks. The Cardinals said in a statement announcing the move that “decisions about fans attending any home games beyond Oct. 25 will be determined and announced at a later date.”

Los Angeles Rams: The Rams will play their first season at SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, Calif., without fans until further notice.

San Francisco 49ers: Although the state of California on Tuesday announced that a reduced number of fans could attend outdoor events, officials in Santa Clara County, where Levi’s Stadium is located, said that would not happen “any time soon” with county executive Jeff Smith calling the idea of opening stadiums “dangerous.”

Seattle Seahawks: The team announced on Thursday that its fourth home game, scheduled for Nov. 1 against the 49ers, will be played with no fans. The team had previously announced before the start of the season that is would play its first three home games were without fans in attendance, with a decision on future games to be made at a later date.