The Washington Post

Griffin’s cryptic note adds to controversy over knee injury

Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III is still recovering from last January’s knee injury. After he sent a cryptic message about his knee this week, NFL observers have been speculating about the relationship between the young player and the team’s staff. Tony Kornheiser of Pardon the Interruption (PTI) writes:

“This is a thinly-veiled, direct shot at his coach, Mike Shanahan, for saying that if anything happens to Griffin in the future, it’s not Shanahan’s fault, which is nonsense. It’s a direct shot. Right? Direct.”

Whether or not Griffin meant to criticize his coach, others have taken Shanahan to task for letting Griffin stay in the team’s final game of the season, which they lost to Seattle. Tracee Hamilton writes:

The Redskins learned nothing. . . there was a gaggle of adults on that sideline, adults with medical degrees, adults who are paid to look at the big picture, who let the kid put himself back on the field.

Shanahan has said that the quarterback must learn to protect himself from injury on the field. Mike Jones writes that it is also up to the coaching staff not to rely too heavily on Griffin to run the ball when he returns to competition:

The Post’s LaVar Arrington wonders if Robert Griffin III will ever be the same quarterback after suffering another knee injury in the Redskins’ loss to the Seahawks and offers his injured pinky as a small example of this type of damage that a body can absorb during a career in football. (The Washington Post)

They’ll be tempted to take advantage of his world-class speed and dial up the option plays and quarterback keepers that greatly confounded opponents last season.

Shanahan last week seemed to dismiss the notion that Washington would scrap those pages of the playbook post-RGIII-surgery. . . .

But, the coach and offensive coordinator need to find a balance.

Griffin was a rookie last season who came to Washington from Baylor University. Read Dave Sheinin’s profile of the quarterback from before the start of the season here.

Max Ehrenfreund writes for Wonkblog and compiles Wonkbook, a daily policy newsletter. You can subscribe here. Before joining The Washington Post, Ehrenfreund wrote for the Washington Monthly and The Sacramento Bee.


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