He was tired of seeing his mom’s car get damaged by some of the dreaded potholes that pockmark roads across the country as winter fades and spring arrives.

So Monte Scott decided to do something about them. The 12-year-old got out a shovel, found some dirt and started to fill the potholes on a part of his street in Muskegon Heights, Mich., according to the Detroit Free Press.

A video of Monte filling potholes was recorded and posted on Facebook. It quickly generated 50,000 views.

On Facebook, Trinell Renee Payne wrote, “This is my son fixing the potholes on Maffett street in Muskegon Heights off of Summit.” She went on to say that he had a half-day of school, so “he decided to fill the potholes because he doesn’t want his mom and grandma to mess up our cars.”

She added: “I love my son. He has a heart of gold.”

This is my son fixing the potholes on Maffett street in Muskegon Heights off of Summit. He had a half day of school so he decided to fill the potholes because he doesn’t want his mom and grandma to mess up our cars. I love my son. He has a heart of gold.

Posted by Trinell Renee Payne on Wednesday, March 27, 2019

The local mayor — Kimberley Sims — told the Free Press that there’s a “constant issue of potholes” and that crews are working daily to deal with them. She complimented Monte’s efforts.

“He’s 12; he should be getting ready for the school the next day, or playing video games,” she said. She called his work fixing potholes a “true testament” to his concern for his family and neighborhood, according to the Free Press.

Monte’s mom said her son filled about 15 potholes near his house.

And he wanted to fix others on the street.

One man can be heard complimenting Monte in the video. He calls him a hard worker and says, “You’re going to be something.”

In the D.C. region, potholes have hit the area hard as well, and crews have tried to keep up with fixing them.

In the District, there were 7,000 complaints of potholes from just January through mid-March, marking the most for that same time period since 2015. The complaints were double what city officials received over that time span in 2018.

Transportation experts said the weather’s freeze-thaw pattern of cold and warm temperatures has added to the number of potholes.

The potholes are created when moisture gets under the roadway’s asphalt and concrete, then collects and freezes. That causes the pavement to expand. With the weight of vehicles on the road, plus temperatures rising and ice thawing, the pavement contracts and forms a pothole.