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Having beers at Lubianka Bar.
NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE

A guide to local favorites in Teusaquillo

Having beers at Lubianka Bar.
  • By Alexandra Correa
  • Photos by Juan Cristóbal Cobo
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Teusaquillo
Bogota, Colombia
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The homes in this traditional and historic sector, located near the city center, stand out for their spaciousness and lush gardens. Jewish, Lebanese, Turkish and German migrants who fled World War II lived here for many years, alongside political personalities and the Bogota elite; famous artists, as well as students and foreigners, live in these houses today. Teusaquillo is an artsy district, with a strong theater tradition.

Meet Alexandra Correa

Alexandra Correa is a journalist from Bogota. After university, she lived for a time in the United States, Spain and Germany before returning home to continue her career writing. In her spare time, she likes to explore all the regions of Colombia, especially the Caribbean coast, and try new restaurants. She loves cats, empanadas and coffee.

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Teusaquillo

The Park Way
One block wide and 2,600 feet long, this simple park provides Teusaquillo residents with a pleasant public green space. Designed by Austrian urban planner Karl Brunner and built in 1950, it is where the locals catch up, exercise, walk their dogs and hang out late.
ParkWay, Cl. 39a, Bogota, Colombia
Casa Ensamble
You’ll have to know some Spanish to understand the shows at this multistage performing-arts laboratory, which you will spot immediately for its bright art deco facade. But each of its experimental works will help you better understand Colombian culture. Casa E also campaigns against gender violence.
Cra. 24 No. 41-69, Bogota, Colombia
Lubianka Bar
A pub with delicious hamburgers, Colombian snacks and a backdrop of rock music. What sets it apart, though, is the small attached gallery-museum, dedicated to the period from 1964 to 2016, when FARC was an active army. Displays of clothing, photographs and books illustrate what guerrillas’ lives were like.
Carrera 39 # 25-13, Bogota, Colombia
Take home art by ex-FARC rebels
If you want to take home a FARC souvenir, visit Tienda de Arte La 42, an art store, bookstore and cafe, owned and run by an ex-combatant. It houses pictures from different regions of the country, painted by ex-guerrillas who use art to convey the emotions of their post-fighting reality. You can also buy their coffee, beer and Inca nuts.
Calle 42 # 22-45, Bogota, Colombia
Despensa de la Sierra
Buy an authentic tote or backpack, woven with sheep’s wool by indigenous peoples, in this packed-to-the-ceiling, rustic store owned and operated by members of the Arhuaco community of northern Colombia. You can learn about the Arhuaco world through the crafts and organic products here, including cocoa, honey and coffee. (Java addicts: Coffee from the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountain range, on the Caribbean coast, is noted for its mildness and low acidity compared to what’s grown in volcanic soils in the Andes.)
Calle 39 # 24-59, Bogota, Colombia
There's more to see
Alexandra Correa
Alexandra Correa is a journalist from Bogota. After university, she lived for a time in the United States, Spain and Germany before returning home to continue her career writing. In her spare time, she likes to explore all the regions of Colombia, especially the Caribbean coast, and try new restaurants. She loves cats, empanadas and coffee.
Juan Cristóbal Cobo
Juan is a contributing photographer to The Washington Post based in Bogota. His favorite place there is the historic center of the city in general, where he feels most alive. Holding at once the scars from the past and present, it is, to him, an unending parade of interesting people to watch.

CITY GUIDES