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NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE

A guide to local favorites in Gràcia

  • By Meg Bernhard
  • Photos by Javier Luengo
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Gracia
Barcelona
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Gràcia is an escape from the big city. On weekdays, the neighborhood is quiet, but on the weekends, it comes to life as locals stroll the narrow streets to shop and dine. During the summer, the neighborhood’s plazas fill up with teenagers drinking beer and strumming guitars. On certain holidays, like the famous Festa Major in August or the Hogueras de Sant Antoni in January, people gather in the neighborhood for what can only be described as a giant block party with bonfires.

Meet Meg Bernhard

Meg has lived in and out of Barcelona since 2017. During her time in Catalonia, she’s worked as a journalist and lived on vineyards. A California native, Meg feels right at home in Barcelona, where sunshine, sea, and wine are aplenty.

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Gracia

Plaça de la Vila de Gràcia
This plaza is a central meeting point for friends and the setting of the neighborhood’s biggest parties. The facades of the buildings that surround the plaza are painted in bright blues and pinks, and a large 19th-century clock tower rises from the center of the square. Come here in the afternoon or evening for a beer and conversation.
Carrer de Mozart and Carrer de Goya
Casa Vicens
This spectacular Gaudí house is tucked away on a side street in Gràcia. Casa Vicens, commissioned as a private home, mixes Arabic minarets and arches with Gaudí’s colorful modernisme. Enjoy the facade from the street, or step inside for a tour of the interior and gardens.
Casa Vicens, Carrer de les Carolines, 20
Carrer de Verdi
Carrer de Verdi is a tree-lined boulevard full of boutique shops, bookstores, bars and one of Barcelona’s best-known movie theaters. You’ll notice yellow ribbons and Catalan flags strung on balconies; this street, like most of Gràcia, is one of the city’s most independentista blocks — many of its residents favor Catalan secession.
Carrer de Verdi and Carrer de Terol
Xurreria Trebol
On your way into the heart of Gràcia, head to this small churrería for a cup of chocolate and churros fresh out of the fryer. If you’re a dough lover, this place is for you. Make sure to try a bunyol, a typical Catalan fried dough ball, sprinkled in sugar or drizzled in hot chocolate.
Xurreria Trebol, Carrer Corsega 341
Plaça del Sol
Young Spaniards tend to hang around this Gràcia plaza in the evenings and on the weekends with guitars and music. Visit with a group of friends and snacks bought from a nearby store, then sit for a few hours on benches or the ground. It’s like having an urban picnic.
Carrer del Sol and Carrer de Ros de Olano
Meg Bernhard
Meg has lived in and out of Barcelona since 2017. During her time in Catalonia, she’s worked as a journalist and lived on vineyards. A California native, Meg feels right at home in Barcelona, where sunshine, sea, and wine are aplenty.
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megbernhard
Javier Luengo
Javier is a contributing photographer to The Washington Post based in Barcelona.

CITY GUIDES