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Visitors routinely have their portraits made in front of the large murals painted on warehouses in Graffiti Park.
NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE

A guide to local favorites in EaDo

Visitors routinely have their portraits made in front of the large murals painted on warehouses in Graffiti Park.
  • By Drew Jones
  • Photos by Brandon Thibodeaux
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The east side of Houston has quickly become the inside-the-Loop go-to for young out-of-towners and locals alike as the city’s metropolitan sprawl continues toward the far reaches of the suburbs.

East Downtown, or EaDo, was a dull district filled with unused industrial buildings about 10 years ago when developers started buying them up in hopes of creating housing. The playbook used by cities like Memphis was carried out, and a sports stadium was built, spurring commercial development from the inside out.

Will the booming development avoid a pricing bubble that forces out longtime residents? It remains to be seen. But for now, everything shiny and new in town seems to be popping up in EaDo.

Meet Drew Jones

Drew is a Houston-based reporter for By The Way. He reports on breaking travel news and trends.

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EaDo

Graffiti Park
The once-illegal art form of spray-painting art on the sides of old buildings grew so popular in Houston that about six years ago, the city started commissioning local artists to use public spaces as their canvases. Take a walk down Saint Emanuel Street to see the dozens of graffiti pieces and painted murals that line the walls of an entire block of unused industrial space.
Graffiti Park, 2102 Leeland St., Houston, Tex. 77003
Nancy’s Hustle
Everything at Nancy’s Hustle just whispers cool, from the effortlessly chic staff that glides through the dimly lit dining room to ’90s hip-hop playing from the in-house speakers. This isn’t a hurry-up-and-eat kind of spot. You’ll want to try every dish, savor every course and start planning your return trip the second you finish.
Nancy’s Hustle, 2704 Polk St. Ste. A, Houston, Tex. 77003
Truck Yard
It’s hard to imagine a space that offers more to do when the patio weather is just right than Truck Yard. The indoor-outdoor “adult playground” has Skee-Ball machines, a food truck park, Hawaiian-themed luaus and an on-site Ferris wheel complete with skyline views and a beer included for $10 a ride.
Truck Yard, 2118 Lamar St., Houston, Tex. 77003
True Anomaly Brewing
Fermentation exploration is the ethos of this imaginative brewery founded by a group of friends with backgrounds in rocket science. The local selection rotates frequently, but expect palate-diverse beers like Berliner weisses, saisons and wild ales. On Sundays you can join a pay-what-you-can mural and brewery tour starting at 6 p.m.
True Anomaly Brewing, 2012 Dallas St., Houston, Tex. 77003
The Secret Group
Styled as a bar and multipurpose venue, Secret Group hosts comedy shows, musical acts, drag shows and decade-themed dance parties. When nothing is on the events calendar, it acts as a club on a busy corner in EaDo with a rooftop patio and a rotation of late-night food trucks.
The Secret Group, 2101 Polk St., Houston, Tex. 77003
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Drew Jones
Drew is a Houston-based reporter for By The Way. He reports on breaking travel news and trends.
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Brandon Thibodeaux
Brandon Thibodeaux is a contributing photographer to The Washington Post based in Houston. In addition to his assignment work and creative commissions, he explores life in the American South.

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