Weather
(Claritza Jimenez, Daron Taylor, Angela Fritz/ The Washington Post)
How do scientists know when and where an eclipse will happen?
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Capital Weather Gang’s Angela Fritz explains how math is used to determine the timing and location of an eclipse, such as the one that crossed the U.S. on Aug. 21.
Capital Weather Gang’s Angela Fritz explains how math is used to determine the timing and location of an eclipse, such as the one that crossed the U.S. on Aug. 21.
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