(Whitney Shefte/The Washington Post)
National
With their population expanding, can Yellowstone grizzlies co-exist with humans?
Humans nearly killed off grizzly bears in the early 20th century, but the Yellowstone population has recovered enough to recently be removed from the Endangered Species list. Their increasing movement beyond the national park means they’re more likely to come into contact and conflict with people.
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