Washington Post Live  ·   September 16, 2016

Brain-machine interfaces could force us to reconsider the definition of disability

- Johns Hopkins University engineer Michael McLoughlin told The Washington Post Wednesday that advancements in technologies should force us to rethink the definition of what is considered a disability in today’s society. “In the prosthetics world, we’ve seen people argue about whether or not somebody with a prosthetic leg has an unfair advantage over somebody that’s able-bodied,” McLoughlin said. “Just imagine when we are able to actually communicate via the brain. Somebody that has a disability may be far more superior than any of us.” ()

- Johns Hopkins University engineer Michael McLoughlin told The Washington Post Wednesday that advancements in technologies should force us to rethink the definition of what is considered a disability in today’s society. “In the prosthetics world, we’ve seen people argue about whether or not somebody with a prosthetic leg has an unfair advantage over somebody that’s able-bodied,” McLoughlin said. “Just imagine when we are able to actually communicate via the brain. Somebody that has a disability may be far more superior than any of us.” ()

Brain-machine interfaces could force us to reconsider the definition of disability (23:01)

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