July 16 at 11:00 a.m. ET
The emergence of the novel coronavirus has presented huge obstacles for people living with cancer and the health-care workers who care for them. Ned Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute, will discuss how COVID-19 is affecting cancer care across the country. As an oncologist and the former U.S. FDA commissioner, Sharpless has spent his career dedicated to advancing cancer research and treatment. And Dempsey Center founder, actor Patrick Dempsey, will address the unique challenges facing cancer non-profit organizations working to improve access to care and support for families during the pandemic. Cancer survivor and Maryland Governor Larry Hogan (R) joins us to discuss his new book, "Still Standing: Surviving Cancer, Riots, a Global Pandemic, and the Toxic Politics that Divide America," which chronicles his battle fighting non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma while serving as the state’s chief executive. From his perspective as the chair of the National Governors Association, Hogan will also offer insight into how the nation’s governors are navigating the pandemic as new cases of COVID-19 skyrocket across the country.
In a segment presented by Pfizer, Andy Schmeltz (@andyschmeltz), global president & general manager of Pfizer’s Oncology division will discuss the challenges, barriers and inequities within the current health-care system, and what we can do to fix it.
Full Segments
Ned Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute, discusses how COVID-19 is affecting cancer care and treatment across the country.
  • Jul 16
Cancer survivor and Maryland Governor Larry Hogan (R) joins us to discuss his new book, “Still Standing: Surviving Cancer, Riots, a Global Pandemic, and the Toxic Politics that Divide America,” which chronicles his battle fighting non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma while serving as the state’s chief executive.
  • Jul 16
The emergence of the novel coronavirus has presented huge obstacles for people living with cancer and the health-care workers who care for them. Ned Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute, will discuss how COVID-19 is affecting cancer care and treatment across the country. We will also hear from Dempsey Center founder, actor Patrick Dempsey, about the unique challenges facing cancer non-profit organizations working to improve access to care and support for families during the pandemic. Cancer survivor and Maryland Governor Larry Hogan (R) joins us to discuss his new book, “Still Standing: Surviving Cancer, Riots, a Global Pandemic, and the Toxic Politics that Divide America,” which chronicles his battle fighting non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma while serving as the state’s chief executive. In a segment presented by Pfizer, Andy Schmeltz, global president & general manager of Pfizer’s Oncology division will discuss the challenges, barriers and inequities within the current health-care system, and what we can do to fix it. Join these conversations led by Washington Post senior writer Frances Stead Sellers at 11:00 a.m. E.T. on Thursday, July 16.
  • Jul 16
Highlights
Ned Sharpless, MD, director of the National Cancer Institute, has said estimates by the institute show there will be 10,000 more breast and colorectal cancer deaths over the next decade than would have been expected without the coronavirus. Sharpless said those estimate were made early on in the pandemic, so there is now concern that the numbers were conservative. ‘I think the pandemic has provided more disruptions than we modeled in.’
  • Jul 16
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan was diagnosed with an advanced, aggressive form of cancer just months into his first term. Looking back on that time in his life, Hogan says he was more worried about his family and how they were going to feel. ‘When I got this diagnoses my first thought was how am I going to explain this to the family and how do I keep them from being too worried.’
  • Jul 16
Many Maryland school districts have yet to make a decision about when and how schools will reopen in the fall. Gov. Larry Hogan said the decision to reopen schools has been one of the most challenging decisions the state has faced. ‘Everyone wants to get our kids back in school as soon as we can, but we also want to make sure that we only do it in a way that’s the safest possible way.’
  • Jul 16
Actor Patrick Dempsey says his work in television has also been affected by the coronavirus. He says some production has begun in Europe, but it will be a long time before the industry gets back into real production. ‘Like everyone else, I’m waiting to see what happens.’
  • Jul 16
Actor Patrick Dempsey’s mother died from ovarian cancer. He says her battle inspired him to created the Dempsey Center, an organization in Lewiston, Maine, that helps cancer patients and their families manage the impact of a cancer diagnosis. ‘That’s how the center evolved. How do we make life better for people?What are the questions that they’re going to ask us, and how do we get those answers back that will hopefully give them some sort of comfort in this.’
  • Jul 16
Patrick Dempsey
Actor and Founder, Dempsey Center
Wendy Tardif
Executive Director, Dempsey Center
Wendy’s work with the Dempsey Center began in 2008 when she set the vision and spearheaded the execution of the first Dempsey Challenge, which continues to be the largest fundraising event for the Dempsey Center. In 2010, she became the first executive director of the Dempsey Center and under her leadership, the Center staff has grown the Center from a single local health system cancer support program to a thriving independent non-profit organization with 3 locations, including Dempsey Connects virtual center established in 2020. Prior to her work at the Dempsey Center, Wendy worked in the field of community and public health for over thirty years, cofounding Healthy Androscoggin and playing an instrumental role in the creation of the CMMC Health and Wellness Center. She is on the leadership team of the Maine Association of Cancer Support Centers.
Ned Sharpless, MD
Director, National Cancer Institute
Norman E. “Ned” Sharpless, M.D., was officially sworn in as the 15th director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on October 17, 2017. From April 5, 2019 to November 1, 2019, Dr. Sharpless served as Acting Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Prior to his NCI appointment, he served as the director of the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a position he held since January 2014. Dr. Sharpless was a Morehead Scholar at UNC–Chapel Hill and received his undergraduate degree in mathematics. He went on to pursue his medical degree from the UNC School of Medicine, graduating with honors and distinction in 1993. He then completed his internal medicine residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and a hematology/oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care, both of Harvard Medical School in Boston.
Gov. Larry Hogan
Maryland (R)
Governor Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr. was sworn in as the 62nd governor of the State of Maryland on January 21, 2015. In 2018, he was overwhelmingly re-elected to a second four-year term, receiving the most votes of any Maryland gubernatorial candidate and becoming only the second Republican governor to be re-elected in the 242 year history of the state. In his first inaugural address, Governor Hogan reminded citizens of Maryland’s history as a state of middle temperament and pledged to advance the best ideas, regardless of which side of the political aisle they come from. He is recognized nationally as a strong, independent leader who consistently delivers real results and achieves common sense, bipartisan solutions.
Moderated by Frances Stead Sellers
The Washington Post
Content from Pfizer
As the public health burden of COVID-19 and diseases like cancer continues to grow, the need for a dynamic healthcare system that can develop and deliver vital treatments has never been more important. Breakthrough science is leading to innovative vaccines and medicines across a range of diseases. But, these breakthroughs mean nothing if they can’t get to the people who need them, which happens far too often today. Andy Schmeltz (@andyschmeltz), Global President & General Manager of Pfizer Oncology, will discuss the challenges, barriers, and inequities within the current healthcare system, and what we can do to help fix it.
  • Jul 16
Andy Schmeltz (@andyschmeltz)
Global President & General Manager, Pfizer Oncology
Andy Schmeltz is the Global President and General Manager of Pfizer Oncology. In this role, he leads the team responsible for Pfizer's industry-leading portfolio of 23 innovative cancer medicines and biosimilars that reached more than 568,000 people living with cancer worldwide in 2019. Under Andy’s leadership, the business has experienced tremendous and continued growth. In 2019, he championed the $11.4 billion acquisition of Array BioPharma Inc. to strengthen the division's leadership in cancer care and expand the company's portfolio into additional areas of unmet medical need. Beyond oncology, Andy has held numerous leadership positions in different therapeutic areas during his 25 years in the healthcare industry, including cardiovascular-metabolic, neuroscience and pain, infectious disease, inflammation and immunology, as well as consumer health. Prior to his current role, he was Senior Vice President of Pfizer’s Patient & Health Impact division, where he was accountable for demonstrating the value of Pfizer’s medicines and vaccines as well as ensuring people around the world gain affordable, timely access to these products. Before joining Pfizer, Andy worked at Abbott Laboratories.
Interviewed by Elise Labott
Adjunct Professor, American University
Elise Labott is a leading journalist covering foreign US foreign policy and international issues, most recently as CNN’s Global Affairs Correspondent. She has reported from more than . 80 countries, traveled the world with seven secretaries of state and has interviewed many world leaders and newsmakers. Elise is the founder of Twopoint.o Media, a digital media platform that aims to engage, inform and inspire citizens to solve today’s most pressing global challenges, and an adjunct professor at American University's School of International Service. She is a contributor to Politico, provides commentary for MSNBC, NPR, BBC and several other broadcast outlets and is a sought-after interviewer and moderator. Elise also serves as a global ambassador for Vital Voices, an organization that empowers female entrepreneurs around the world and is on the advisory committee of Global Kids DC, a program which introduces high school students in underserved communities to international affairs. Prior to joining CNN, Elise covered the UN for ABC News and also reported on diplomatic and foreign policy issues for Agence France-Presse and other publications. Elise is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She received her bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and earned a master's degree from the New School for Social Research.
About Washington Post Live
Washington Post Live is the newsroom’s live journalism platform. Top-level government and business leaders, emerging voices and newsmakers discuss the most pressing national and global issues of the day.
    Presented by