In the wake of mass social upheaval and a global pandemic, concerned leaders are examining the nature of the capitalist system and its relationship to conditions that spurred and intensified these twin crises. Income inequality and the role pervasive institutional and individual privilege plays in creating a growing wealth gap will be addressed when Ford Foundation president Darren Walker joins Washington Post columnist David Ignatius to talk about rethinking modern capitalism. (The Washington Post)
July 23 at 11:00 a.m. ET

Ford Foundation president Darren Walker on reimagining American capitalism

In the wake of mass social upheaval and a global pandemic, concerned leaders are examining the nature of the capitalist system and its relationship to conditions that spurred and intensified these twin crises. Income inequality and the role pervasive institutional and individual privilege plays in creating a growing wealth gap will be addressed when Ford Foundation president Darren Walker joins Washington Post columnist David Ignatius to talk about rethinking modern capitalism.
  • Jul 23
Highlights
Ford Foundation President Darren Walker says what we have seen mostly in corporate America is tokenism. “We have 162 of the S&P 500 companies who have no African-American on the board…they are not delivering on diversity, equity and inclusion…we’re going to start to hear about reverse discrimination, this pernicious idea that has been propagated by those who do not want change…we’re going to have to take those people on and those institutions that are seeking to impede the progress that we must make…”
  • Jul 23
Ford Foundation President Darren Walker says that inequality has also been harmful for white people who are feeling economically insecure. “The very things we are talking about have harmed [them] as well…we have to realize something very profound is happening in America. For the first time in the history of this nation, we have a generation of downwardly mobile white people…this is…profoundly toxic for our democracy…that white voter needs to understand that his interests are aligned with the interests of African-Americans and others who all have been losers in an economic system that has rendered to many of them redundant and unnecessary.”
  • Jul 23
When asked whether the name of the Ford Foundation is still appropriate, Ford Foundation President Darren Walker says that his foundation’s original benefactor, Henry Ford, was an anti-Semite and a racist, but also a brilliant industrialist who was the first capitalist to name inequality as a problem. “Henry Ford was a complicated, flawed genius. I am able to hold both of those narratives…the duality of who we are as a people cannot be denied and we must come to grips with how to hold both of those narratives…I am comfortable, I do not believe that we need to be named anything other than the Ford Foundation because without Henry Ford…we wouldn’t be doing the work that we do in the world today."
  • Jul 23
Darren Walker
President, Ford Foundation
David Ignatius
The Washington Post
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