One of the many lessons learned from 2020: wellness for employees has taken on a meaning far beyond our physical health. From shoestring start-ups to legacy corporations, American companies have identified the powerful value of working towards a purpose beyond profits, and to find ways to achieve well-being in the workplace.

Hear from top executives and prominent thought leaders on what businesses are doing to reflect the human values of a new age and embrace corporate responsibility in new and innovative ways.

Highlights

Walgreens has tapped Starbucks executive Roz Brewer as its new CEO, making her the third Black woman to lead a Fortune 500 firm. Ursula Burns, who was the first, says she's "unbelievably proud." "I'm so happy to no longer be the only." (Washington Post Live)
Former Xerox CEO Ursula Burns says there’s a lack of diversity in corporate leadership because “we've allowed it to be the case.” “We've not made people accountable for thinking more expansively when they consider talent...we've not prioritized looking for diverse talent." (Washington Post Live)
Wharton School Dean Erika James and former Xerox CEO Ursula Burns say companies and schools can no longer ignore social justice issues. James says we have reached a “critical mass of young people who are not willing to tolerate a lack of accountability” when it comes to social issues….There is no going back from this moment.” Burns added, “The fundamental question is which forward are we going to accept. There’s a bad forward and a good forward, but I think the status quo, for sure, is over.” (Washington Post Live)
When asked how companies can create an anti-racist work environments, Warby Parker co-founder Neil Blumenthal said they can first release their diversity statistics. “You can't create a diverse organization if you don’t create an inclusive organization.” (Washington Post Live)
Warby Parker co-founder Neil Blumenthal says his company has made employee well-being a priority by introducing initiatives like increased communication so that employees feel connected and mental health resources. (Washington Post Live)

Guests

Neil Blumenthal, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, Warby Parker

Neil Blumenthal is a co-founder and co-CEO of Warby Parker, the eyewear brand founded with a mission to inspire and impact the world with vision, purpose and style. Since day one, over seven million pairs of glasses have been distributed through its Buy a Pair, Give a Pair program. Warby Parker was previously named the most innovative company in the world by Fast Company.

Prior to launching Warby Parker in 2010, Neil served as director of VisionSpring, a nonprofit social enterprise that trains low-income women to start their own businesses selling affordable eyeglasses to individuals living on less than $4 per day in developing countries.

Neil was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum and one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business by Fast Company. He serves on the board of Allbirds, Sweetgreen, and the nonprofits RxArt, the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City, and the Partnership Fund for New York City. He also sits on the leadership councils of Robin Hood and Tech:NYC.

A native of New York City, Neil received his BA from Tufts University and his MBA from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Neil lives in Greenwich Village with his wife, Rachel, the founder and CEO of Rockets of Awesome, and their two children.

Ursula Burns, Senior Adviser, Teneo and Former CEO, Xerox

Ursula Burns has extensive international experience of large companies confronting technology change of their industries. In June 2017 she was appointed as Chairman of VEON Ltd. She became Chairman and CEO in December 2018 until June 2020. Ursula Burns was the Chairman of the Board of the Xerox Corporation from 2010 to 2017 and Chief Executive Officer from 2009 to 2016. Burns joined Xerox as an intern in 1980 and during her career she has held leadership posts spanning corporate services, manufacturing and product development. She was named president in 2007. During her tenure as chief executive officer, she helped the company transform from a global leader in document technology to the world’s most diversified business services company serving enterprises and governments of all sizes. Shortly after being named CEO in 2009, she spearheaded the largest acquisition in Xerox history, the $6.4 billion purchase of Affiliated Computer Services.

In 2016, she led Xerox through a successful separation into two independent, publicly traded companies – Xerox Corporation, which is comprised of the company’s Document Technology and Document Outsourcing businesses, and Conduent Incorporated, a business process services company.

Ursula, who regularly appears on Fortune’s and Forbes’ list of the world’s most powerful women, is a board director of Uber, Nestlé, Exxon Mobil, Ford Foundation, Waystar and IHS Towers. U.S. President Barack Obama appointed Ursula to help lead the White House national program on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) from 2009-2016, and she served as chair of the President’s Export Council from 2015-2016 after service as vice chair 2010-2015. She also provides leadership counsel to several other community, educational and nonprofit organizations including the Ford Foundation, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Corporation, Cornell Tech Board of Overseers, the New York City Ballet, and the Mayo Clinic among others. Burns is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, The Royal Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Ursula holds a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Columbia University and a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York University.

Erika James, Dean, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

Erika H. James became the dean of the Wharton School on July 1, 2020. Trained as an organizational psychologist, Dean James is a leading expert on crisis leadership, workplace diversity and management strategy.

Prior to her appointment at Wharton, Dean James was the John H. Harland Dean at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School from 2014 to 2020. An award-winning educator, accomplished consultant and researcher, she is the first woman and first person of color to be appointed dean in Wharton’s 139-year history. As such she has paved the way for women in leadership both in education and corporate America. Dean James has been instrumental in developing groundbreaking executive education programs, including the Women’s Leadership program at the University of Virginia’s Darden School.

Known internationally, Dean James was named as one of the “Top 10 Women of Power in Education” by Black Enterprise and as one of the “Power 100” by Ebony. She has been quoted as an expert thought leader by the Wall Street Journal, MSNBC, CNN.com and numerous other media outlets.

In addition to her academic responsibilities, Dean James is a board member of SurveyMonkey, a California-based market research and customer-experience company, the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) and several organizations that align with her passion for education and advancing women in business. She is also a board member of Save the Children, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children through better education, health care and economic opportunities.

Dean James holds a Ph.D. and Master’s degree in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan, as well as a Bachelor’s degree in psychology from Pomona College of the Claremont Colleges in California.

Content from Citrix

This content was produced and paid for by a Washington Post Live event sponsor. The Washington Post newsroom was not involved in the production of this content.

Broadcaster Kelly Collis talks with Donna Kimmel, chief people officer at Citrix, and Amit Sood, executive director of the Global Center for Resiliency and Well-Being, about incorporating well-being programs and benefits into their employee experience strategy. With pandemic impacts upending and further blending lines between work and life, it is now more critical than ever for leaders to face well-being challenges head on for their employees to thrive. They’ll explore why there is newfound emphasis on well-being programs, tactics on how to address workforce needs and advice for a healthy workforce of the future. (Washington Post Live)

Can We Really Separate Work from Well-Being?

Broadcaster Kelly Collis talks with Donna Kimmel, chief people officer at Citrix, and Amit Sood, executive director of the Global Center for Resiliency and Well-Being, about incorporating well-being programs and benefits into their employee experience strategy. With pandemic impacts upending and further blending lines between work and life, it is now more critical than ever for leaders to face well-being challenges head on for their employees to thrive. They’ll explore why there is newfound emphasis on well-being programs, tactics on how to address workforce needs and advice for a healthy workforce of the future.

Amit Sood, MD, Executive Director, Global Center for Resiliency and Well-Being

Dr. Sood is one of the world’s leading experts on resilience and wellbeing, and executive director of the Global Center for Resiliency and Wellbeing.

He was also professor of medicine, and Chair for student life and wellness at Mayo Clinic.


Donna Kimmel, Executive Vice President and Chief People Officer, Citrix

Donna Kimmel is the executive vice president and chief people officer of Citrix.

She is responsible for all aspects of identifying, fostering and developing top talent as well as overseeing organizational strategies that maximize engagement and position the company to win in the marketplace.


Moderated by Kelly Collis, Partner, Real.Fun.DC

Kelly Collis is a native Washingtonian and has been working in the DC area for more than 20 years. In 2011, after working for more than a decade in public relations and marketing, she decided to try her hand at radio with one of her best friends, Tommy McFLY. She and Tommy hosted a morning show on 94.7 Fresh FM in Washington, DC, for eight years. She also founded CityShopGirl, a subscription email publication delivering updates on lifestyle in the DC area, and was nominated for hosting one of the best blogs by the Washingtonian Magazine. Washington Life named Kelly one of the top 200 influencers under 40 in DC three years in a row. She was featured on the cover of Washington Family Magazine with her 2 children and most recently named one of the “Women of Style” by DC Modern Luxury Magazine.