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Race in America: History Matters with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden joins The Post’s Robin Givhan on Feb. 5 (Video: The Washington Post)
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Black History Month is a time we pay tribute to the vast contributions of Black Americans to our country. On Friday, Feb. 5 at 1:00pm ET, Washington Post senior critic-at-large Robin Givhan speaks with Carla Hayden, who made history as the first woman and the first African American to lead the Library of Congress, about marking this moment in the wake of widespread protests over the death of George Floyd, and how the past informs our understanding of the present.

Click here for transcript

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden on the origins of Black History Month (Video: The Washington Post)
Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden on how Black history has been taught in schools (Video: The Washington Post)
Carla Hayden on inaugural poet Amanda Gorman and the power of poetry (Video: The Washington Post)
Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden on efforts to chronicle recent history (Video: The Washington Post)

Carla Hayden

Carla Hayden was sworn in as the 14th Librarian of Congress on September 14, 2016. Hayden, the first woman and the first African American to lead the national library, was nominated to the position by President Barack Obama on February 24, 2016, and her nomination was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on July 13.

Prior to her latest post she served, since 1993, as CEO of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland. Hayden was nominated by President Obama to be a member of the National Museum and Library Services Board in January 2010 and was confirmed to that post by the Senate in June 2010. Prior to joining the Pratt Library, Hayden was deputy commissioner and chief librarian of the Chicago Public Library from 1991 to 1993. She was an assistant professor for Library and Information Science at the University of Pittsburgh from 1987 to 1991. Hayden was library services coordinator for the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago from 1982 to 1987. She began her career with the Chicago Public Library as the young adult services coordinator from 1979 to 1982 and as a library associate and children’s librarian from 1973 to 1979.

Hayden was president of the American Library Association from 2003 to 2004. In 1995, she was the first African American to receive Library Journal’s Librarian of the Year Award in recognition of her outreach services at the Pratt Library, which included an after-school center for Baltimore teens offering homework assistance and college and career counseling. Hayden received a B.A. from Roosevelt University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the Graduate Library School of the University of Chicago.

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