Gregory M. Glenn, MD, is the president of research and development at vaccine maker Novavax, whose COVID-19 vaccine candidate is the first to demonstrate clinical efficacy against the original coronavirus and both of the variants first identified in the U.K. and South Africa. If approved, the Novavax vaccine will be the first protein-based vaccine available, and the company is already working on an updated version of the vaccine to test against the new variants.

Highlights

In a UK trial, Novavax’s vaccine was 89.3 percent effective overall in preventing the original virus and the variant first discovered there. Gregory M. Glenn, MD, president of research and development at Novavax, explains how their vaccine candidate produces a strong immune response. (Washington Post Live)
Gregory M. Glenn, MD, president of research and development at Novavax, says the drug developer plans to apply for emergency use authorization in the U.S. in the second quarter. (Washington Post Live)
This week, Novavax completed enrolling 30,000 volunteers in a late-stage study of its COVID-19 vaccine in the U.S. and Mexico. Gregory M. Glenn, MD, president of research and development at Novavax, credited its “fruitful” partnerships with the U.S., as well as its relationship with the NIH, University of Maryland and Howard University. (Washington Post Live)
Gregory M. Glenn, MD, president of research and development at Novavax, ( they’re working on a vaccine that combines the flu vaccine with their coronavirus vaccines. “We have a basis for combining these two very good vaccines into an annual, seasonal flu vaccine, and we’ve begun work on that already.” (Washington Post Live)

Gregory M. Glenn, MD

Dr. Glenn is the president of research and development and leads the discovery, clinical, and regulatory teams. He has spent 28 years in the design and development of vaccines, vaccine delivery, and adjuvants. He has led the development of products from concept to late-stage clinical development, including COVID-19, RSV, recombinant adjuvanted seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines, Ebola, and an Enterotoxigenic E. coli vaccine patch, and participated in other programs including the development of a malaria vaccine. He is the cofounder of IOMAI and provided the scientific and technical leadership that led to the acquisition by Intercell in 2008. He worked for Intercell from 2008 to 2010. He is the coauthor of more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications. Dr. Glenn was board certified and practiced pediatrics prior to completing a Medical Research Fellowship at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research where he continued as a clinician-researcher prior to entering into commercial vaccine development in 1997. Dr. Glenn received a bachelor of arts degree in biology and chemistry from Whitman College in Washington and a doctor of medicine degree from Oral Roberts University School of Medicine in Oklahoma.