America’s energy needs are rapidly evolving. While recent crises in California and Texas have exposed the vulnerabilities in America’s electricity infrastructure, advances in solar and wind energy, efficiency improvements, and important technologies such as carbon capture and hydrogen, are showing promise.

Washington Post Live will gather thought leaders and government officials to discuss how we can help meet America’s future energy needs. Join the conversation with former U.S. secretary of energy Ernest Moniz and Duke Energy CEO Lynn Good on Tuesday, March 30 at 1:00pm ET.

Highlights

The White House recently announced an ambitious plan to expand wind farms along the East Coast. Former U.S. secretary of energy Ernest Moniz says it has to happen because there aren’t a lot of options in the Northeast. “Particularly here in the northeast, we don’t have a lot of options, to be perfectly honest. We are going to need to electrify a lot of our economy, and here in the northeast, particularly, bluntly, if we are not going to allow modern nuclear power plants to be built, for example, we are not well positioned for capturing CO2 and burying it underground. So offshore is one of the few places where we can go, and it’s got to be very, very large.” (Washington Post Live)
Former U.S. secretary of energy Ernest Moniz says a carbon tax on its own is not sufficient. “The economists all say this is a way of cutting down on what you don’t want, mainly emissions. However, I want to emphasize that just talking about a tax in isolation is not sufficient. Let’s say we have a tax. What do you do with the funds? The late George Schultz was an advocate, for example, for a tax, but the tax was combined, in his proposal, with a uniformed dividend that went out to everybody. And the important point there is that that is socially progressive. Those on the lower end of the income scale are going to come out net-ahead. […] It really has to be looked at as more than just a tax. What do you do with it? How do you address the progressive nature that I think we need? (Washington Post Live)
Duke Energy CEO Lynn Good says nuclear energy is critical for reaching the goal of net zero emissions. “Duke Energy is the largest operator of nuclear power and regulating markets in the U.S. We have 11 reactors in the Carolinas producing carbon-free energy every hour. It’s about 50-60% of energy in the Carolinas…as I think about bringing nuclear into the conversations we’ve been having about climate, Duke Energy does not see a way to get to carbon reduction at the speed that we need to achieve without nuclear energy.” (Washington Post Live)
Duke Energy CEO Lynn Good says a durable public policy that provides incentives around research and development is needed. “What we are looking for is durable public policy, that is market-based, that recognizes this cost-effectiveness, and also that provides some incentives around research and development.“ (Washington Post Live)

Guests

Ernest Moniz, Former U.S. Secretary of Energy

Ernest J. Moniz served as the thirteenth United States Secretary of Energy from 2013 to January 2017. As Secretary, he advanced energy technology innovation, nuclear security and strategic stability, cutting-edge capabilities for the American scientific research community, and environmental stewardship. He placed energy science and technology innovation at the center of the global response to climate change and negotiated the Iran nuclear agreement alongside the Secretary of State.

Dr. Moniz joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty in 1973 and was Founding Director of the MIT Energy Initiative. He is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems emeritus and Special Advisor to the MIT President. Dr. Moniz is co-chairman of the Board of Directors and CEO of the Nuclear Threat Initiative and CEO of the Energy Futures Initiative. He served on Boards of numerous companies, non-profits and government agencies in the energy and security arenas.

Dr. Moniz received a Bachelor of Science degree summa cum laude in physics from Boston College, a doctorate in theoretical physics from Stanford University, and ten honorary doctorates from American and European universities. He received the Distinguished Public Service Medal of the Department of Defense, the Grand Cross of the Order of Makarios III (Cyprus) and of the Order of Prince Henry the Navigator (Portugal), the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun (Japan) and the inaugural Award for Excellence in Public Policy and Public Affairs of the American Academy of Arts and Science.

Lynn Good, CEO, Duke Energy

Lynn Good is chair, president and chief executive officer of Duke Energy, one of America’s largest energy holding companies. Under her leadership, Duke Energy has intensified its focus on serving its customers and communities well today while leading the way to a cleaner, smarter energy future.

Before becoming CEO in 2013, she served as Duke Energy’s chief financial officer and earlier led the company’s commercial energy businesses during its initial development of renewable energy projects. She began her utility career in 2003 with Cincinnati-based Cinergy, which merged with Duke Energy three years later. Prior to 2003, she was a partner at two international accounting firms, including a long career with Arthur Andersen.

Fortune magazine lists Good as 23rd among the “Most Powerful Women in Business,” and Forbes magazine calls her one of “The World’s 100 Most Powerful Women.” In 2016, she became the first regulated utility CEO designated as a LinkedIn Influencer – an online thought-leadership program – and recently ranked 9th on the Brunswick “Top 100 Connected Leaders” Index.

Under Good’s leadership, Duke Energy is embracing new technologies and smarter solutions to transform for the future. In 2017, Duke Energy unveiled a 10-year vision to build a smarter, more resilient energy grid, generate cleaner energy and expand the company’s natural gas infrastructure. This strategy ensures customers have access to safe, reliable and clean energy while strengthening the company’s environmental stewardship. Since 2005, the company has reduced carbon dioxide emissions by 39% and plans to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.

Duke Energy has paid a quarterly cash dividend on its common stock for 95 consecutive years. The company has also been named to the Forbes list of “America’s Best Employers” and recognized by Fortune as one of the “World’s Most Admired Companies” in the electric and gas utilities industry.

Good currently serves on the boards of directors for Boeing, the Edison Electric Institute, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, the World Association of Nuclear Operators, the Business Roundtable and myFutureNC. She also serves on the advisory council of the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art in Charlotte, N.C. Good holds Bachelor of Science degrees in systems analysis and accounting from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She and her husband, Brian, live in Charlotte.

Content from GE

This content was produced and paid for by a Washington Post Live event sponsor. The Washington Post newsroom was not involved in the production of this content.

When it comes to the energy transition, GE is uniquely positioned to deliver impactful solutions. We’ve led the industry since its creation and today we provide a third of the world’s electricity, equip the technology for 90% of power transmission utilities worldwide and manage the software of 40% of the world’s energy. We offer solutions across the energy universe, from wind and gas to both the physical and digital grid. In the U.S. and around the world, we approach today’s energy challenges with the on-the-ground experience that will help prepare for a better tomorrow. Join us as we discuss what solutions we believe are best positioned to move the needle – both today and in the future – and what policies we believe will best help industry, government and the public address these challenges as effectively and efficiently as possible. (Washington Post Live)

The Path Forward: A Roadmap for the Future of Energy

When it comes to the energy transition, GE is uniquely positioned to deliver impactful solutions. We’ve led the industry since its creation and today we provide a third of the world’s electricity, equip the technology for 90% of power transmission utilities worldwide and manage the software of 40% of the world’s energy. We offer solutions across the energy universe, from wind and gas to both the physical and digital grid. In the U.S. and around the world, we approach today’s energy challenges with the on-the-ground experience that will help prepare for a better tomorrow. Join us as we discuss what solutions we believe are best positioned to move the needle – both today and in the future – and what policies we believe will best help industry, government and the public address these challenges as effectively and efficiently as possible.

Scott Strazik, CEO, GE Gas Power

Scott is the Chief Executive Officer of GE’s Gas Power business, which combines the talent, technology and capabilities of the company’s Gas Power Systems and Power Services businesses into one unified gas life cycle organization. Gas Power offers power producers the technology, services, knowledge and insights they need to build, operate and maintain gas power generation plants. Scott has more than 20 years of finance, operations and leadership experience with GE, including seven years in the company’s gas power businesses. In 2011, he was named Chief Financial Officer for GE Aviation’s Commercial Engine Operations organization; in July 2013, he was named Chief Financial Officer for GE’s Gas Power Systems business. He was also the Sales & Commercial Operations leader for Gas Power Systems and helped launch GE’s HA gas turbine with 100+ booked orders in the program’s first five years —one of GE’s most successful new product introductions.


Vic Abate, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, GE

Vic Abate is Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of GE. In this role, he is responsible for leading the company’s global research, engineering, and product management teams. GE Research is GE’s innovation powerhouse where research meets reality. Research facilities, located in Niskayuna, New York and Bangalore, India, work in collaboration with GE businesses to deliver world-changing innovations and capabilities for customers. Vic joined GE in 1990. In a career at GE spanning more than 25 years, Vic has held several management roles in engineering, services, production, and quality, including President and CEO of GE Renewable Energy from 2005-2013, and President and CEO of Gas Power Systems for GE Power from 2013-2015. Prior to joining GE, Vic worked for Allied Signal and Zurn Industries and was responsible for mechanical drive technology and new product development.


Moderated by Jeanne Meserve, Journalist, CTV News

Jeanne Meserve is a homeland security expert and analyst, moderator, and award-winning journalist. She is currently a Security Expert for Canada’s CTV News. While a correspondent and anchor at CNN and ABC Jeanne earned her profession’s highest honors, including two Emmys and an Edward R. Murrow Award. She also contributed to two CNN Peabody Awards.

Jeanne is a member of the Homeland Security Experts Group and the Transatlantic Commission on Election Integrity, and serves on the board of the non-profit Space Foundation.

She moderates discussions on topics ranging from technology and security, to medicine and the environment. Clients include AtlanticLIVE, the Munich Security Conference, the Aspen Security Forum, the Halifax International Security Forum, and the global conferences of the International Women’s Forum.

At CNN Meserve created the homeland security beat, covering intelligence, law enforcement, cyber, aviation, border and port security. She anchored worldwide coverage of the Yitzhak Rabin assassination and the death of Princess Diana, and was the first to report on the devastating flooding in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. She was a key member of the CNN political team during the 1996 and 2000 elections. While at ABC News she covered the State Department and reported from the Middle East, Asia and Europe.