She is the European Union’s top anti-trust enforcer and renowned for taking up the fight against tech giants. European Commission executive vice president Margrethe Vestager has long tried to curtail the power of big tech companies. She joins Washington Post Live to discuss how those companies harness vast troves of data, work to quash competition, are moving into more aggressive content moderation and whether privacy concerns can be used to limit competition.

Highlights

Margrethe Vestager, the European Commission executive vice president, said she’s “really encouraged” by President Biden’s recent executive order targeting big tech companies. “I find that this executive order exactly puts a finger on something really important that people in their everyday life should have the benefit of competition.” (Washington Post Live)
When asked her thoughts about Section 230, the U.S.’s internet protection law,” Margrethe Vestager, the European Commission executive vice president, said it can be difficult to define content that is illegal hate speech from content that is hurtful and damaging, but not illegal. “We do not regulate on content. We’re trying to have a uniformed, sort of pan-European way of dealing with the fact that sometimes things are to be removed because they are illegal and sometimes that leads to over removal and that has to be dealt with.” (Washington Post Live)
Margrethe Vestager, the European Commission executive vice president, said European Commission will delay its plans for a digital levy until October. "We have delayed until October, which should allow us to see details of the OECD agreement." (Washington Post Live)

Margrethe Vestager

Provided by the European Commission.

Margrethe Vestager, age 52, is Executive Vice president for a Europe fit for the digital age. She previously served as Commissioner for Competition (2014-19). She was Minister for Economic Affairs and the Interior (2011-14) and Minister for Education (1998-2001) of Denmark. She was Political leader of the Danish Social Liberal Party (2007-14), and has worked for the Danish Ministry of Finance (1993-95). Ms. Vestager holds an MSc in Economics (University of Copenhagen).