Parts of an engine and landing gear in a pile after being gathered by workers during the recovery efforts at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 on March 11, 2019, in Bishoftu, Ethiopia. (Jemal Countess/Getty Images)

It may be weeks or months until we know why Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed minutes after takeoff Sunday, killing all 157 passengers and crew on board — if the cause of the crash is determined at all.

But the crash is drawing comparisons to another air disaster, the Oct. 29 wreck of Lion Air Flight 610, which went down off the coast of Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board.

On Wednesday, President Trump grounded the type of aircraft involved in both crashes — Boeing 737 Max — following the European Union and more than a dozen other nations that took action earlier in the week.

The Federal Aviation Administration’s order to ground the planes states that the similarities between the two crashes “warrant further investigation of the possibility of a shared cause for the two incidents that needs to be better understood and addressed.”

Although the Indonesian crash is still under investigation, a preliminary report released in October by local authorities offers details that are strikingly similar to the Ethiopian Airlines flight.

Both incidents involved the Boeing 737 Max 8. And there are other parallels: Both aircraft crashed just minutes after takeoff; both struggled to gain altitude; and both appeared to ascend and descend several times before crashing.

Both flights crashed within minutes of takeoff

Lion Air Flight 610 took off from Jakarta’s Soekarno-Hatta International Airport at 6:20 a.m. Oct. 29 in clear conditions. Just 12 minutes into its journey to Depati Amir Airport in Pangkal Pinang, it crashed into the sea off the coast of Java.

Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 left Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at 8:38 a.m. en route to Nairobi. It lost contact with air traffic control roughly six minutes later, crashing near Bishoftu, less than 40 miles away. Thus far, there is no indication that bad weather was involved.

[Read the preliminary report on the Lion Air Flight 610 crash in Indonesia]

Both flights struggled to gain altitude

When Lion Air Flight 610 left Jakarta, it was supposed to reach a cruising altitude of 27,000 feet, according to the preliminary report. But the aircraft struggled to gain altitude, limiting the crew’s room to gain control before the plane plummeted into the ocean at a reported 450 mph.

Flight 302’s altitude was abnormally low

beginning shortly after takeoff from the

airport at Addis Ababa, which is more

than 7,000 feet above sea level.

15,000

feet above mean sea level

Altitude of previous

737 Max flights

Last point

of recorded

flight data

10,000

Flight 302

5,000

0

1

2

3

Minutes after takeoff

Source: Flightradar24

Flight 302’s altitude was abnormally low beginning

shortly after takeoff from the airport at Addis Ababa,

which is more than 7,000 feet above sea level.

15,000

feet above mean sea level

Altitude of previous

737 Max flights

10,000

Last point

of recorded

flight data

Flight 302

5,000

0

1

2

3

Minutes after takeoff

Source: Flightradar24

Flight 302’s altitude was abnormally low beginning shortly after takeoff

from the airport at Addis Ababa, which is more than 7,000 feet above

sea level.

15,000

feet above mean sea level

Expected altitude based

on previous flights

10,000

Last point

of recorded

flight data

Flight 302

5,000

0

1

2

3

Minutes after takeoff

Source: Flightradar24

Flight 302’s altitude was abnormally low beginning shortly after takeoff from the airport

at Addis Ababa, which is more than 7,000 feet above sea level.

15,000

feet above mean sea level

Altitude of previous

737 Max flights

10,000

Last point

of recorded

flight data

Flight 302

5,000

0

1

2

3

Minutes after takeoff

Flight 302’s altitude was abnormally low beginning shortly after takeoff from the airport at Addis Ababa, which is more than 7,000 feet above sea level.

15,000

feet above mean sea level

Altitude of previous

737 Max flights

10,000

Last point

of recorded

flight data

Flight 302

5,000

0

1

2

3

Minutes after takeoff