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As the official U.S. death toll surpassed 10,000 — standing at 10,530, including 4,758 in New York — Surgeon General Jerome M. Adams warned that this will be “the hardest and saddest week of most Americans’ lives.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, sick with covid-19 and suffering from a persistent cough and fever, was moved to intensive care after his condition worsened on Monday afternoon.

Here are some significant developments:

  • The fatalities in New York state held steady on Monday for the second consecutive day at about 600 deaths — a once-unthinkable statistic that now gives officials some cautious reason to hope that the pandemic may be cresting there.
  • A survey of hospitals across the country showed health-care workers are facing shortages of tests, masks, face shields, ventilators and staff. President Trump rejected the results of the report, which was compiled by the Inspector General of Health and Human Services, suggesting it was political.
  • U.S. and global stock markets soared on Monday as investors took in overseas progress against the coronavirus.
  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) told fellow Democratic lawmakers Monday that the next coronavirus relief bill could “easily” pass $1 trillion in cost. Congressional leaders and the White House are converging on the need for a new assistance package.
  • A leading coronavirus forecast model used by the White House predicted Monday that the United States may need fewer hospital beds, ventilators and other equipment. Experts and state leaders, however, noted the model conflicts with others that show higher peaks.
  • Rapid developments on Monday have left Wisconsin voters confused about the status of Tuesday’s elections. Hours after the governor suspended in-person voting, a court ruling reinstated it. The U.S. Supreme Court then reversed an extension of the mail-in ballot deadline, a decision criticized by Pelosi.

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