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Biden will go to Europe next week for NATO summit; European leaders travel to Kyiv

Mykolaiv is all that stands in the way of Russian forces as they try to advance on Odessa. The city is holding the line, but families feel trapped. (Video: Whitney Leaming, Jorge Ribas/The Washington Post, Photo: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)

This live coverage has ended. For Wednesday’s live updates, click here.

President Biden will travel to Europe next week for a NATO summit on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the White House said Tuesday.

Biden’s participation in the March 24 summit at NATO headquarters was announced as the heads of three governments in the European Union — the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia — traveled to Kyiv to meet with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Their visit is meant to “confirm the unequivocal support of the entire European Union for the sovereignty and independence of Ukraine,” the Czech prime minister said in a Facebook post.

Meanwhile, Ukraine’s deputy prime minister said about 20,000 people have been evacuated from the port city of Mariupol, where officials said their efforts to establish a “humanitarian corridor” were thwarted until early this week. The Washington Post cannot independently verify the number of evacuations. Conditions in Mariupol — home to 400,000 people — grew dire amid a Russian blockade, with food and water dwindling and bodies going to mass graves.

Here’s what to know

  • As many as 55 Ukrainian children become refugees every minute, joining the more than 3 million people who have fled Ukraine since Russia’s invasion. Here are some of their stories.
  • While Moscow has gained control of southern cities such as Kherson and Melitopol, it is struggling to take over other hubs, including Mariupol, Kharkiv, Chernihiv and Sumy. A curfew took effect in Kyiv, the capital, after a missile attack on an apartment building killed at least four people.
  • Russia President Vladimir Putin said negotiations with Ukraine remain at an impasse, telling a European Council leader that Kyiv “is not showing a serious commitment to finding mutually acceptable solutions,” according to the Kremlin’s readout.
  • Pierre Zakrzewski, a cameraman for Fox News, was killed Monday alongside a Ukrainian colleague, Oleksandra Kuvshynova, while reporting outside Kyiv, according to statements from Fox News and Ukrainian officials.
  • Zelensky will virtually address a joint session of Congress on Wednesday morning in an attempt to rally more American support.
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Here's what to know:

As many as 55 Ukrainian children become refugees every minute, joining the more than 3 million people who have fled Ukraine since Russia’s invasion. Here are some of their stories.
While Moscow has gained control of southern cities such as Kherson and Melitopol, it is struggling to take over other hubs, including Mariupol, Kharkiv, Chernihiv and Sumy. A curfew took effect in Kyiv, the capital, after a missile attack on an apartment building killed at least four people.
Russia President Vladimir Putin said negotiations with Ukraine remain at an impasse, telling a European Council leader that Kyiv “is not showing a serious commitment to finding mutually acceptable solutions,” according to the Kremlin’s readout.
Pierre Zakrzewski, a cameraman for Fox News, was killed Monday alongside a Ukrainian colleague, Oleksandra Kuvshynova, while reporting outside Kyiv, according to statements from Fox News and Ukrainian officials.
Zelensky will virtually address a joint session of Congress on Wednesday morning in an attempt to rally more American support.

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War in Ukraine: What you need to know

The latest: Russia claimed to have seized control of Soledar, a heavily contested salt-mining town in eastern Ukraine where fighting has raged recently, but a Ukrainian military official maintained that the battle was not yet over. The U.S. and Germany are sending tanks to Ukraine.

Russia’s Gamble: The Post examined the road to war in Ukraine, and Western efforts to unite to thwart the Kremlin’s plans, through extensive interviews with more than three dozen senior U.S., Ukrainian, European and NATO officials.

Photos: Washington Post photographers have been on the ground from the beginning of the war — here’s some of their most powerful work.

How you can help: Here are ways those in the U.S. can support the Ukrainian people as well as what people around the world have been donating.

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