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Russia steps up attacks on Ukraine’s railways, power stations

Smoke could be seen in Lviv, Ukraine, after a Russian missile attack on May 3. (Video: AP)

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Russia expanded its attack on Ukrainian infrastructure Tuesday, targeting railways and power stations far from the war’s front line, while continuing to pepper the country’s east with strikes that officials say killed more than 20 civilians, one of the area’s worst known single-day tolls in recent weeks.

In Lviv, a relatively peaceful western city, the sound of Moscow’s rockets cut through the night, destroying three electrical substations and disrupting power and water service. Elsewhere in central and western Ukraine, missiles hit six train stations, and the railway chief called the damage “severe.” Meanwhile, in the contested Donetsk province, a regional governor said Russian strikes had killed at least 21 people Tuesday, including 10 deaths at an industrial plant.

Here’s what else to know

  • French President Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday told Russian President Vladimir Putin that he is ready to help counter a Russian blockade on Ukrainian food exports.
  • Pentagon officials said Ukraine’s commitment to training by NATO and its demonstration of leadership had given Kyiv an edge in the fight against Moscow.
  • Ukraine’s top prosecutor said authorities have found evidence of Russian war crimes in the Kyiv suburb of Irpin, including murder, torture and rape.
  • The U.S. government is now characterizing Brittney Griner’s arrest in Russia as a “wrongful detainment.”
  • The Washington Post has lifted its paywall for readers in Russia and Ukraine. Telegram users can subscribe to our channel.
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Here's what to know:

French President Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday told Russian President Vladimir Putin that he is ready to help counter a Russian blockade on Ukrainian food exports.
Pentagon officials said Ukraine’s commitment to training by NATO and its demonstration of leadership had given Kyiv an edge in the fight against Moscow.
Ukraine’s top prosecutor said authorities have found evidence of Russian war crimes in the Kyiv suburb of Irpin, including murder, torture and rape.
The U.S. government is now characterizing Brittney Griner’s arrest in Russia as a “wrongful detainment.”
The Washington Post has lifted its paywall for readers in Russia and Ukraine. Telegram users can subscribe to our channel.

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War in Ukraine: What you need to know

The latest: Russia fired at least 85 missiles on at least six major cities in Ukraine on November 15, in one of the most widespread attacks of the war so far. The strikes came just hours after Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, speaking by video link, presented a 10-point peace plan to G-20 leaders at a summit in Indonesia. As in previous Russian missile attacks, critical civilian infrastructure appeared to be primary targets. Parts of several cities that were hit were left without electrical power on Tuesday afternoon.

Russia’s Gamble: The Post examined the road to war in Ukraine, and Western efforts to unite to thwart the Kremlin’s plans, through extensive interviews with more than three dozen senior U.S., Ukrainian, European and NATO officials.

Photos: Washington Post photographers have been on the ground from the beginning of the war — here’s some of their most powerful work.

How you can help: Here are ways those in the U.S. can support the Ukrainian people as well as what people around the world have been donating.

Read our full coverage of the Russia-Ukraine war. Are you on Telegram? Subscribe to our channel for updates and exclusive video.

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