The Washington PostDemocracy Dies in Darkness

G-7 leaders vow to phase out Russian oil; Jill Biden visits Ukraine

First lady Jill Biden receives flowers from Olena Zelenska, wife of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, outside a school in Uzhhorod, a Ukrainian town along the border with Slovakia, on May 8. (Susan Walsh/Pool/Reuters)

UZHHOROD, Ukraine — President Biden and leaders of the Group of Seven nations vowed to phase out, or altogether ban, the import of Russian oil in response to Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine, they said after a video meeting with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The move is intended to hit the “main artery” of Russia’s economy and deny President Vladimir Putin “the revenue he needs to fund the war,” the White House said. The United States has already banned the import of Russian oil, and the European Union is considering a proposal to do the same. The G-7 pledge came the same day that first lady Jill Biden went to western Ukraine and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau traveled to Kyiv, visits meant to underscore the West’s support.

Here’s what else to know

  • Ukrainian fighters in Mariupol’s embattled steel plant, the port city’s last holdout, pledged to fight “as long as we are alive, for justice,” as Zelensky appealed for their evacuation after the last civilians were allowed to leave the facility.
  • The International Committee of the Red Cross said about 170 civilians who spent weeks at the steel plant had arrived in Zaporizhzhia on Sunday.
  • A senior American diplomat on Sunday visited the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv, which personnel had departed a few days before Russia’s invasion. Although the visit did not signal that the United States has officially reopened of the embassy, the Biden administration plans to do so.
  • The Washington Post has lifted its paywall for readers in Russia and Ukraine. Telegram users can subscribe to our channel.
Press Enter to skip to end of carousel

Here's what to know:

Ukrainian fighters in Mariupol’s embattled steel plant, the port city’s last holdout, pledged to fight “as long as we are alive, for justice,” as Zelensky appealed for their evacuation after the last civilians were allowed to leave the facility.
The International Committee of the Red Cross said about 170 civilians who spent weeks at the steel plant had arrived in Zaporizhzhia on Sunday.
A senior American diplomat on Sunday visited the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv, which personnel had departed a few days before Russia’s invasion. Although the visit did not signal that the United States has officially reopened of the embassy, the Biden administration plans to do so.
The Washington Post has lifted its paywall for readers in Russia and Ukraine. Telegram users can subscribe to our channel.

1/4

End of carousel

War in Ukraine: What you need to know

The latest: Russia fired at least 85 missiles on at least six major cities in Ukraine on November 15, in one of the most widespread attacks of the war so far. The strikes came just hours after Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, speaking by video link, presented a 10-point peace plan to G-20 leaders at a summit in Indonesia. As in previous Russian missile attacks, critical civilian infrastructure appeared to be primary targets. Parts of several cities that were hit were left without electrical power on Tuesday afternoon.

Russia’s Gamble: The Post examined the road to war in Ukraine, and Western efforts to unite to thwart the Kremlin’s plans, through extensive interviews with more than three dozen senior U.S., Ukrainian, European and NATO officials.

Photos: Washington Post photographers have been on the ground from the beginning of the war — here’s some of their most powerful work.

How you can help: Here are ways those in the U.S. can support the Ukrainian people as well as what people around the world have been donating.

Read our full coverage of the Russia-Ukraine war. Are you on Telegram? Subscribe to our channel for updates and exclusive video.

Loading...