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Liz Truss installed as U.K. prime minister, replacing Boris Johnson

British Prime Minister Liz Truss gives her first speech as the country's leader after meeting with Queen Elizabeth II on Sept. 6. (Video: The Washington Post)

LONDON — After months of upheaval, Britain relied on predictable and time-honored traditions Tuesday as power and an abundance of economic and political problems were transferred from Prime Minister Boris Johnson to Prime Minister Liz Truss.

Highlights of the day: Liz Truss gets queen’s nod, becomes U.K. prime minister, in day of pageantry

Here’s how the day unfolded

  • Johnson and Truss traveled, in separate planes, to see Queen Elizabeth II — at Balmoral Castle in Scotland, rather than the traditional Buckingham Palace setting. The 96-year-old queen has missed many events on the royal calendar because of her health. But she did not appear to want to delegate this one.
  • In a private audience, Johnson bowed to the queen and tendered his resignation. Truss followed, asking permission to form a government. The ceremony is called “kissing hands,” though in modern politics there is no kissing.
  • Truss returned to London as Britain’s 56th prime minister. She delivered a brief speech outside the official Downing Street residence, pledging that she was “determined to deliver” and that the country would “ride out the storm” of economic head winds. The United Kingdom now joins a small club of nations that have had at least three female elected or appointed heads of government.
  • Earlier in the day, in farewell remarks, Johnson referred to himself as a booster rocket that has “fulfilled its function.” He also boasted of his accomplishments and compared himself to Cincinnatus, a Roman statesman who stepped down for the good of the Republic, but, according to legend, later came out of retirement to lead the people again. Despite all the scandals, Johnson remains popular with his party’s grass roots and may someday stage a comeback.
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Here's what to know:

Johnson and Truss traveled, in separate planes, to see Queen Elizabeth II — at Balmoral Castle in Scotland, rather than the traditional Buckingham Palace setting. The 96-year-old queen has missed many events on the royal calendar because of her health. But she did not appear to want to delegate this one.
In a private audience, Johnson bowed to the queen and tendered his resignation. Truss followed, asking permission to form a government. The ceremony is called “kissing hands,” though in modern politics there is no kissing.
Truss returned to London as Britain’s 56th prime minister. She delivered a brief speech outside the official Downing Street residence, pledging that she was “determined to deliver” and that the country would “ride out the storm” of economic head winds. The United Kingdom now joins a small club of nations that have had at least three female elected or appointed heads of government.
Earlier in the day, in farewell remarks, Johnson referred to himself as a booster rocket that has “fulfilled its function.” He also boasted of his accomplishments and compared himself to Cincinnatus, a Roman statesman who stepped down for the good of the Republic, but, according to legend, later came out of retirement to lead the people again. Despite all the scandals, Johnson remains popular with his party’s grass roots and may someday stage a comeback.

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