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Wildfires, floods, typhoons: 24 hours of photos show climate change threat

Wind whips embers from a burning tree during a wildfire on Sept. 6 near Hemet, Calif. (Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP)
correction

A previous version of this article incorrectly included a Chinese earthquake among the disasters influenced by climate change. The section has been removed.

This summer has been dominated by extreme weather and natural disasters across the globe. There are wildfires in California and typhoons in the Pacific. Europeans baked in record-breaking temperatures. One-third of Pakistan was underwater due to flooding.

A snapshot of images taken over the past 24 hours illustrate the devastation that world leaders and environmental experts say should be a wake-up call for climate action.

Pakistan

More than 1,300 people have been killed and millions have lost their homes in flooding caused by unusually heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan this year, conditions that many experts have blamed on climate change.

Pakistan’s leaders called the floods “apocalyptic,” and pleaded for aid from developed nations — which they blamed for contributing to extreme weather. “I can say without any fear of contradiction, this flood situation is probably the worst in the history of Pakistan,” Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif said last week.

South Korea

Typhoon Hinnamnor, the strongest cyclonic storm this year so far, hit South Korea this week. Seven people are known to be dead after being stuck overnight in an underground car park.

Thailand

Flash floods occurred in many areas of Bangkok this week due to heavy rain and the Chao Phraya River overflowing its banks. Thailand’s Meteorological Department issued a severe weather warning.

Yemen

Flash floods have ravaged Yemen since April, affecting more than 300,000 people.

California

A prolonged, record-setting heat wave put nearly 50 million Americans under alerts through Labor Day weekend. The power grid is being pushed to its limits.

The Fairview Fire in California has grown to 4,500 acres and claimed the lives of two people so far.

Susannah George contributed to this report.

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