The Washington PostDemocracy Dies in Darkness

Monarch buried next to Prince Philip at Windsor

Queen Elizabeth II's coffin traveled from Westminster Hall to Wellington Arch and to her final resting place, Windsor Castle, for her state funeral on Sept. 19. (Video: Alexa Juliana Ard/The Washington Post)

LONDON — Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-serving monarch, has been laid to rest next to Prince Philip, her husband of more than 70 years, capping a day of pomp and ceremony that unfolded with metronomic precision and extraordinary attention to detail.

Monday’s rites began with 96 bell rings — one for each year of Elizabeth’s life — at Westminster Abbey, where her state funeral would be held. More than 90 world leaders, representatives from dozens of royal families and members of the House of Windsor — including the queen’s great-grandchildren George and Charlotte — attended the large, initial service, which was followed by a procession to Windsor Castle along a route lined with dense crowds. That route led to a royal vault at St. George’s Chapel at Windsor, where the queen’s coffin was lowered before her burial, which the royal family’s website confirmed Monday.

Key moments from the day:

  • At the closing of the Westminster Abbey service, the congregation sang “God Save the King.” Then there came a last piece of music, “Sleep, dearie, sleep,” played on a bagpipe by Paul Burns of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
  • At a more intimate service at Windsor, punctuated by hymns, a senior member of the royal household, the Lord Chamberlain, broke his “wand of office,” in a symbolic gesture, and placed it on the coffin.
  • Queen Elizabeth II’s corgis, Muick and Sandy, were brought outside Windsor Castle ahead of the arrival of her coffin. Emma, her Fell pony, was also waiting.
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At the closing of the Westminster Abbey service, the congregation sang “God Save the King.” Then there came a last piece of music, “Sleep, dearie, sleep,” played on a bagpipe by Paul Burns of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
At a more intimate service at Windsor, punctuated by hymns, a senior member of the royal household, the Lord Chamberlain, broke his “wand of office,” in a symbolic gesture, and placed it on the coffin.
Queen Elizabeth II’s corgis, Muick and Sandy, were brought outside Windsor Castle ahead of the arrival of her coffin. Emma, her Fell pony, was also waiting.

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