World

(Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters)
(Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters)

Japan and South Korea never did full lockdowns. It left lessons on how to coexist with the virus.

For many countries, the goal is balancing life and the coronavirus. Japan and South Korea have been at it for a while.

Japan and South Korea never did full lockdowns. It left lessons on how to coexist with the virus.

For many countries, the goal is balancing life and the coronavirus. Japan and South Korea have been at it for a while.

Japan and South Korea never did full lockdowns. It left lessons on how to coexist with the virus.

For many countries, the goal is balancing life and the coronavirus. Japan and South Korea have been at it for a while.

Poland’s democratic backsliding divides the E.U. as it mulls blocking billions in budget funds

With Poland flouting E.U. rules and court orders, the integrity of the 27-nation bloc and its liberal values is under threat.

China wipes Boston Celtics from NBA broadcasts after Enes Kanter slams abuses in Tibet

Chinese social media was filled with angry fans calling for a boycott.

A robot is displaying art at the pyramids. Egypt detained it over spying fears, its maker says.

The robot, that goes by Ai-Da, will showcase artwork at an exhibition at the Giza pyramids opening Thursday.

Moscow prepares for a return to lockdown as covid cases — and deaths — soar

Government officials previously said they wouldn’t return to a lockdown. Russia’s death toll of more than 225,000 is by far Europe’s highest.

Judge rules Afghan militant has been held in Guantánamo illegally, in what lawyers say is the first such ruling in 10 years

Asadullah Haroon Gul, the last ‘low-value’ Afghan detainee, is asking to be freed, citing the end of the U.S. war in Afghanistan.

Prosecutors to challenge ‘Hotel Rwanda’ hero’s 25-year prison sentence

Prosecutors had sought a life sentence for Paul Rusesabagina, whose heroism during the 1994 Rwandan genocide inspired the Hollywood movie. His trial was widely condemned as flawed by international observers.

South Korea successfully launches its first rocket, fails to place test satellite

The nation's space plans include launching satellites for communication, surveillance, navigation and lunar probes.

Austin at NATO to discuss China and Afghanistan, as defense ministers reimagine the alliance’s goals

The two-day meeting of NATO's defense ministers is the first in-person encounter since the pandemic — and the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Climate change is turning the cradle of civilization into a grave

Between the Tigris and Euphrates, intense heat and drought are poisoning the land, emptying the villages.

Scarred by mass shooting, Britain to check social media, medical records of gun license applicants

Two months after a shooting rampage in England, London is tightening firearms licensing procedures.

Putin and Xi look set to disengage as world leaders meet on climate

Low turnout at the COP26 climate summit would also place Britain under the pandemic spotlight once again.

Authors pull out of Frankfurt book fair over presence of far-right groups

Writer and activist Jasmina Kuhnke, who was slated to make an appearance at the fair Friday to promote her debut novel Black Heart, posted a statement on Twitter Monday saying she decided to withdraw after learning that far-right books were being promoted at the event.

How do the U.S. and other countries manage hostage negotiation and ransom payments?

While many states project hardline policies — in practice, it is not so black and white.

Bombs planted on military bus in Damascus kill at least 14, in deadliest attack in years

Soon after the attack, a Syrian military artillery barrage killed at least 13 people in the rebel enclave of Idlib.

Brazilian Senate committee accuses Bolsonaro of crimes against humanity for covid negligence

A lawmaker leading the probe accused the Brazilian president and other officials of making decisions that allowed the coronavirus to spread, resulting in unnecessary deaths.

Health experts want Britain to bring back covid restrictions. The government says: ‘We don’t want to go back.’

There could be "a profound crisis over the next three months" if the government doesn't change course, one expert warns.

A hike through ice caves under Austria’s melting glaciers shows ‘decays’ from climate change

It’s too late to rescue the Jamtalferner glacier in the eastern Alps, scientist Andrea Fischer says, but others still stand a chance.

Mexico is home to millions of illegal American cars. A new amnesty has set off a nationwide debate.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has offered a mass amnesty to the so-called chocolate cars. Opponents call that a blow to the auto industry — and a boon to organized crime.

Putin to stay home during COP26 climate summit in Glasgow

The Russian president is still expected to attend via video link.
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Moscow closing schools, many businesses as virus deaths soar

Moscow authorities have announced plans to shut restaurants, movie theaters and many retail stories for 11 days starting Oct. 28 as Russia registered the highest daily numbers of coronavirus infections and deaths since the pandemic began
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Greece to shelter Afghan human rights workers, families

Greece has agreed to shelter a group of 35 Afghan human rights workers and their families following a short stay in neighboring North Macedonia
  • 23 minutes ago

Thousands rally in Sudan's capital to demand civilian rule

Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Sudan’s capital of Khartoum demanding a fully civilian government
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World's biggest triceratops sells for $7.7 million in Paris

The world’s biggest triceratops skeleton, known as “Big John,” has been sold for 6.6 million euros ($7.7 million) at a Paris auction house
  • 44 minutes ago

Egypt: Man to face trial for live-streamed theft of phone

Egyptian prosecutors have ordered a man to face trial who appeared to steal a journalist’s phone while it was livestreaming in the country’s capital of Cairo
  • 44 minutes ago
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