Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman, center, is escorted by police officers upon arrival for his trial at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, May 18, 2018. Indonesian police have deployed dozens of elite officers to guard the trial of the radical cleric who is accused of being the key ideologue for IS militants in Indonesia and ordering attacks in the country, following a wave of attacks by Islamic State group-inspired militants. (Tatan Syuflana/Associated Press)

JAKARTA, Indonesia — The Latest on the trial of radical Indonesian cleric Aman Abdurrahman (all times local):

11 a.m.

Indonesian prosecutors are demanding a death sentence for radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman for his role in attacks.

The alleged ideological leader of Islamic State militants in Indonesia is accused of ordering several attacks from prison, including a January 2016 suicide bombing and gun attack in the capital Jakarta that killed four civilians and four attackers.

Reflecting a dire lack of supervision of militants in Indonesia’s overcrowded prisons, prosecutors say Abdurrahman was able to spread radicalism and communicate with his supporters on the outside through visitors and video calls.

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9 a.m.

Indonesian police have deployed dozens of elite officers to guard the trial of radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman following a wave of attacks by Islamic State group-inspired militants.

More than 100 officers from counterterrorism and paramilitary units are protecting the South Jakarta District Court on Friday along with numerous plainclothes police.

Abdurrahman is accused of being the key ideologue for IS militants in Indonesia and ordering attacks including a January 2016 suicide bombing and gun attack in the capital Jakarta that killed four civilians and four attackers.

Prosecutors are expected to make a sentencing demand at Friday’s hearing.

Suicide bombings Sunday and Monday in Surabaya, Indonesia’s second-largest city, killed 26 people, including 13 attackers. Two families carried out the attacks, using children as young as 7.

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