Children gather in front of a memorial on Saturday, March 16, 2019, where an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed nearly a week earlier near Addis Ababa, Ethi­o­pia. (Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images)

Preparations are underway to begin DNA tests to identify remains of the 157 people killed in the crash of an Ethio­pian Airlines last week, authorities announced at a Saturday news conference.

Ethio­pian Minster of Transport Dagmawit Moges said it will likely take five to six months to complete the identification, but DNA samples were already being collected from the relatives of victims to aid in the process.

Moges said temporary death certificates had been issued for the victims of the March 10 crash and the final documents will be ready within two weeks. The death certificates are based on a list of passengers and crew who were aboard Flight 302.

The plane crashed minutes after taking off from an Addis Ababa airport bound for Nairobi. There were no survivors.

“Victim identification will be carried out using reliable scientific and international standards,” Moges said at the news conference. “We will make sure the post mortem investigation will start soon as possible.”

Moges said France was selected to analyze the plane’s black boxes, instead of the United States, because its proximity to Ethi­o­pia would allow the analysis to be carried out more quickly.

“The whole international community was and is still waiting for the cause of the accident, as the Ethiopian government we are responsible to provide information or to find information as quick as possible,” Moges said.