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Filling Klink's Coffers
Philadelphia Democrats Vow to Bolster Senate Candidate's Fundraising Effort


Early Returns
A daily dose of online news from beyond the Beltway.

By Jason Thompson
Washingtonpost.com Staff Writer
Thursday, June 22, 2000

One day after U.S. Rep. Ron Klink (D-Pa.) fired his Senate campaign's chief fundraiser, Philadelphia Democrats said they are going to take charge of Klink's money drive in the city and surrounding areas. With most of the money raised in statewide politics coming from the Philadelphia area, Democratic leaders vowed to make sure Klink is not underfunded in his race against incumbent Sen. Rick Santorum (R).

Speculation has risen that Klink has fallen behind in his fundraising efforts, creating an additional financial strain on a campaign that was nearly broke before it began, due to an expensive party primary. In an additional effort to fill Klink's coffers, President Clinton will bring his fundraising prowess to Philadelphia on July 10 for an event Democrats hope will pull in between $600,000 and $1.3 million.


"When is the madness going to end?"
Ian Bayne, spokesman for Massachusetts Senate candidate Jack E. Robinson (R), on Democratic charges that Robinson forged signatures to get on the ballot.

Boston Herald, June 21

Democrats Rally to Help Klink Campaign
(Philadelphia Inquirer, June 22)
Klink Fires Campaign Finance Director
(Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, June 21)
More Coverage: Pa. Senate Race


S.C. Court Upholds Video Poker Ban
South Carolina's Supreme Court rejected Wednesday a last-minute lawsuit that claimed the state was illegally taking private property by shutting down video poker operations. Attorney General Charlie Condon said the court's ruling backed up the people's will as well as the legislature's and should be the "final nail in the coffin" for video gambling.
Court Upholds Ban on Poker
(The State, Columbia, S.C., June 22)
Court Puts 'Nail in Coffin' for Video Poker
(The Herald-Journal, Spartanburg, S.C., June 22)


Gore Faces Dilemma in Consideration of Veep Prospects
While the U.S. Senate seems to hold the deepest talent pool of possible running mates for Vice President Gore, the Democratic Party may urge Gore to look elsewhere. The reason is that all of the senators considered likely candidates occupy seats that would probably be filled, either through temporary appointment or full-term election, by Republicans – jeopardizing the Democrats' hopes of cutting into the GOP Senate majority.
Downside for Party If Gore Picks Senator
(The Boston Globe, June 22)


Mass. Democrats Say GOP Senate Candidate Forged Signatures
Massachusetts Senate hopeful Jack E. Robinson (R) vowed to run his longshot Senate campaign without the financial aid of political action committees, though Democrats are not sure he should even run at all. The state Democratic Party says Robinson forged dozens of signatures in order to secure ballot access, a charge the Robinson camp flatly denied.
Robinson Camp Accused of Forging Signatures
(Boston Herald, June 21)
Robinson Says He's in Race for Duration
(Worcester Telegram & Gazette, June 21)
More Coverage: Massachusetts Senate Race


FEC Audit Finds Violations by Missouri Democrats
As part of a routine examination to check compliance with campaign laws, Federal Election Commission auditors found $223,458 worth of improperly reported, soft-money disbursements by the Missouri Democratic Party during the 1996 election cycle. The Party's executive director said a record-keeping error caused the problem and not an attempt to circumvent the law.
Violations Found in Missouri Democratic Party Documents
(The Kansas City Star, June 20)


Another Drunken-Driving Conviction Costs Michigan Lawmaker Post
After pleading guilty to his third drunken-driving offense in 15 years, Michigan state Sen. David Jaye (R) was stripped of five committee assignments in the legislature, including a chairmanship. It's been 25 years since any state lawmaker received similar disciplinary action.
Jaye Stripped of Committee Posts
(The Detroit News, June 21)

Jason Thompson can be reached at jason.thompson@washingtonpost.com

© Copyright 2000 The Washington Post Company

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